UNITED STATES

 

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

______________________________

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

Commission file number 1-8787

 

 

American International Group, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

13-2592361
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

175 Water Street, New York,  New York
(Address of principal executive offices)

10038
(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (212) 770-7000 

______________________________

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: See Exhibit 99.02

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

______________________________

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No ☐ 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes   No ☑ 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes          No ☐ 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☑   No ☐ 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.      ☐ 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer ☑ 

Accelerated filer ☐ 

Non-accelerated filer ☐ 

Smaller reporting company ☐ 

 

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

         

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes     No ☑ 

The aggregate market value of the voting and nonvoting common equity held by nonaffiliates of the registrant (based on the closing price of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was approximately $57,263,000,000.

As of February 13, 2017, there were outstanding 979,560,020 shares of Common Stock, $2.50 par value per share, of the registrant.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Document of the Registrant

Form 10-K Reference Locations

Form 10-K/A to be filed no later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year

Part II, Item 5 and Part III, Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14

 

 

 

  

 


 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Form 10-K

Item Number

Description

Page

Part I 

 

 

ITEM 1.

Business Overview            

3

 

    AIG’s Global Insurance Operations

3

 

    Our Employees

8

 

    Regulation

9

 

    Available Information about AIG

16

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

17

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

29

ITEM 2.

Properties

29

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

29

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

29

Part II 

 

 

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases

 

 

of Equity Securities

30

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

33

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

36

 

    Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information

36

 

    Use of Non-GAAP Measures

38

 

    Critical Accounting Estimates

40

 

    Executive Summary

55

 

    Consolidated Results of Operations

63

 

    Business Segment Operations

67

 

    Investments

103

 

    Insurance Reserves

120

 

    Liquidity and Capital Resources

133

 

    Enterprise Risk Management

145

 

    Glossary

163

 

    Acronyms

166

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

167

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

168

 

Index to Financial Statements and Schedules

168

ITEM 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

301

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

301

Part III 

 

 

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

302

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

302

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder

 

 

Matters

302

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

302

ITEM 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

302

Part IV 

 

 

ITEM 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

302

ITEM 16.

Form 10-K Summary

302

Signatures

 

303

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 


 

Part I

ITEM 1 | Business

 

American International Group, Inc. (AIG)

is a leading global insurance organization. Founded in 1919, today we provide a wide range of property casualty insurance, life insurance, retirement products, and other financial services to commercial and individual customers in more than 80 countries and jurisdictions.

Our diverse offerings include products and services that help businesses and individuals protect their assets, manage risks and provide for retirement security. AIG common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the Tokyo Stock Exchange.

On January 26, 2016, we announced several actions designed to create a leaner, more profitable and focused insurer. In this Annual Report on Form 10-K (Annual Report), we are presenting our businesses consistent with the organizational aspects of that announcement. To carry out these actions, we intend to capitalize on our industry-leading capabilities while we continue to strive to create shareholder value. We believe that these actions will allow us to leverage our key strengths and focus on our 2017 priorities as we strive to be our clients’ most valued insurer.

 

In this Annual Report, unless otherwise mentioned or unless the context indicates otherwise, we use the terms “AIG,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” to refer to American International Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its consolidated subsidiaries. We use the term “AIG Parent” to refer solely to American International Group, Inc., and not to any of its consolidated subsidiaries.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          3

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1 | Business | AIG

 

 

AIG’s Industry Leadership

 

 

 

World Class
Insurance Franchises

that are among the leaders in their categories, focus on improving their operating performance as we strive to be our clients’ most valued insurer.

Balance Sheet
Quality and Strength

as demonstrated by over $76 billion in shareholders’ equity and AIG Parent liquidity sources of $12.9 billion as of December 31, 2016.

Effective
Capital Management

of the largest shareholders’ equity
of any insurance company in the world(a), supported by enhanced risk management.

 

 

 

 

Breadth of Customers

We serve over 87 percent of companies included in the Fortune Global 500(b) and 83 percent of the Forbes 2000(b).

A Diverse Mix of Businesses

with a presence in most international markets.

       

(a) At June 30, 2016, the latest date for which information was available for certain foreign insurance companies.

(b) At November 1, 2016.

 

 

AIG’s Value Creation

           

 

AIG Priorities for 2017

Our primary focus is growth in intrinsic value. The following priorities for 2017 will help us to achieve AIG’s value creation goals.

     Improving our return on equity (ROE)

     Providing innovative solutions to most efficiently meet our clients’ needs

 

     Continuing to reduce general operating expenses

     Improving profitability of Commercial Insurance through underwriting actions and accident year loss ratio improvements

 

 

AIG’s Execution: Accomplishments for 2015 and 2016

*    Non-GAAP measure – see Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) for reconciliation of Non-GAAP to GAAP measure.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            4 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1 | Business | AIG

 

OUR MODULAR MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

AIG’s new operating model

Modules are designed to enhance transparency and accountability, which we anticipate will drive operating improvement and flexibility over time.

In the fourth quarter of 2016, we completed the reorganization of our financial results into business “modules” to enhance transparency and accountability. Additionally, we now report a Legacy Portfolio that aims to maximize shareholder value and better highlight progress on improving the ROE of our Core business. We believe that these actions will allow us to enhance efficiency and profitability and focus on our 2017 priorities by leveraging key strengths, as we strive to be our clients’ most valued insurer.

Our Core businesses include Commercial Insurance and Consumer Insurance, as well as Other Operations.  Commercial Insurance includes two modules – Liability and Financial Lines and Property and Special Risks. Consumer Insurance is comprised of four modules – Individual Retirement, Group Retirement, Life Insurance and Personal Insurance.  As we continue to focus on operating improvement, we are exiting certain lines of business and market regions that we consider non-core and unprofitable while still maintaining a global presence for our Core businesses. The Legacy Portfolio consists of our run-off insurance lines and legacy investments.

Our multinational capabilities provide a diverse mix of businesses through our global offices and branches in more than 80 countries and jurisdictions. Accordingly, we also review and assess the performance of our Core business through the broad locations of our insurance operations across three key geographic modules: the United States, Europe, and Japan. Our disclosure of geography is based on the significant legal entity insurance companies (including branches) operating in those geographic areas. The other geography includes AIG Parent, United Guaranty, Fuji Life, our insurance operations in remaining geographies around the globe and certain legal entities not deemed significant in the key geographic areas. Geography disclosures exclude our Legacy Portfolio.

We have modified the presentation of our business segment results to reflect our new operating structure and prior periods’ presentation has been revised to conform to the new structure.

See Item 7. MD&A and Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion on our business segments.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          5

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1 | Business | AIG

 

Business Modules

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial Insurance

Commercial Insurance is a leading provider of insurance products and services for commercial customers. It includes one of the world’s most far-reaching property casualty networks. Commercial Insurance offers a broad range of products to customers through a diversified, multichannel distribution network. Customers value Commercial Insurance’s strong capital position, extensive risk management and claims experience, and its ability to be a market leader in critical lines of the insurance business.

 

 

Consumer Insurance

Consumer Insurance is a unique franchise that brings together a broad portfolio of retirement, life insurance and personal insurance products offered through multiple distribution networks. It holds long-standing, leading market positions in many of its U.S. product lines, and its global footprint provides the opportunity to leverage its multinational servicing capabilities and pursue select opportunities in attractive markets. With its strong capital position, customer-focused service, innovative product development capabilities and deep distribution relationships across multiple channels, Consumer Insurance is well positioned to provide clients with valuable solutions, delivered through the channels they prefer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Operations

Other Operations consists of businesses and items not attributed to our Commercial and Consumer modules or our Legacy Portfolio. It includes AIG Parent, Institutional Markets, United Guaranty Residential Insurance Company (United Guaranty), AIG Fuji Life Insurance Company, Ltd. (Fuji Life), deferred tax assets related to tax attributes and intercompany eliminations.

Legacy Portfolio

Legacy Portfolio includes Legacy Property and Casualty Run-Off Insurance Lines, Legacy Life Insurance Run-Off Lines and Legacy Investments.

 

 

 

 

 

Geography Modules

 

 

 

United States

includes the following major property and casualty and life insurance companies: National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. (National Union), American Home Assurance Company (American Home U.S.), Lexington Insurance Company (Lexington), American General Life Insurance Company (American General), The Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company (VALIC), and the United States Life Insurance Company in the City of New York (U.S. Life).

 

Europe

includes AIG Europe Limited and its branches, which are property and casualty companies.

Japan

includes the following major property and casualty insurance companies: Fuji Fire and Marine Insurance Company (Fuji Fire), AIUI Japan, and American Home Assurance Company, Ltd. (American Home Japan).

 

 

 

(a)  Represents Operating revenues excluding revenues from our Legacy Portfolio operations of $5.3 billion.  See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for reconciliation of Operating revenues to total revenues.

(b)  Other includes AIG Insurance Company of Canada, American International Reinsurance Company, Ltd., AIG Asia Pacific Insurance, Pte, Ltd., Fuji Life, United Guaranty, various non-insurance subsidiaries and AIG Parent.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            6 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1 | Business | AIG

 

Geographic Concentration

In 2016, 6.3 percent and 5.2 percent of our property casualty direct premiums were written in the states of California and New York, respectively, and 16.0 percent and 7.3 percent were written in Japan and the United Kingdom, respectively. No other state or foreign jurisdiction accounted for more than five percent of our property casualty direct premiums.

Diversified Mix of Businesses

(dollars in millions)

*    Represents Operating revenues excluding revenues from our Legacy Portfolio operations of $5.3 billion.  See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for reconciliation of Operating revenues to total revenues.

How We Generate Revenues and Profitability

We earn revenues primarily from insurance premiums, policy fees and income from investments.

Our expenses consist of policyholder benefits and losses incurred, interest credited to policyholders, commissions and other costs of selling and servicing our products, interest expense and general operating expenses.

Our profitability is dependent on our ability to properly price and manage risk on insurance and annuity products, to manage our portfolio of investments effectively and to control costs through expense discipline.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          7

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1 | Business | AIG

 

Investment Activities of Our Insurance Operations

Our insurance companies generally receive premiums and deposits well in advance of paying covered claims or benefits. In the intervening periods, we invest these premiums and deposits to generate net investment income that, along with the invested funds, is available to pay claims or benefits. As a result, we generate significant revenues from insurance investment activities.

Our worldwide insurance investment policy places primary emphasis on investments in corporate bonds, municipal bonds and government bonds in all of our portfolios, and, to a lesser extent, investments in high yield bonds, common stock, real estate, hedge funds and other alternative investments. Our fundamental strategy across all of our investment portfolios is to optimize the duration characteristics of the assets within a target range based on comparable liability characteristics, to the extent practicable.

See Item 7. MD&A — Investments for additional discussion of investment strategies.

Loss Reserve Development Process

The liability for unpaid losses and loss adjustment expenses (loss reserves) represents the accumulation of estimates for unpaid claims, including estimates for claims incurred but not reported (IBNR) for our property and casualty insurance companies, including the related expenses of settling those losses.

The process of establishing loss reserves is complex and imprecise because it must take into consideration many variables that are subject to the outcome of future events. As a result, informed subjective estimates and judgments about our ultimate exposure to losses are an integral component of our loss reserving process. Because reserve estimates are subject to the outcome of future events, changes in prior year estimates are unavoidable in the insurance industry. These changes are sometimes referred to as “prior year loss development” or “reserve development.”

See Item 7. MD&A — Critical Accounting Estimates — Insurance Liabilities — Loss Reserves, Item 7. MD&A — Insurance Reserves — Loss Reserves, and Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion on loss reserves and of prior year loss development.

 

Our Employees

At AIG, we believe that a major strength of ours is the quality and dedication of our people. At December 31, 2016 and 2015, we had approximately 56,400 and 66,400 employees, respectively. We believe that our relations with our employees are satisfactory.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            8 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

Regulation

Our operations around the world are subject to regulation by many different types of regulatory authorities, including insurance, securities, derivatives, investment advisory and thrift regulators in the United States and abroad.

Our insurance subsidiaries are subject to regulation and supervision by the states and jurisdictions in which they do business.  The insurance and financial services industries generally have been subject to heightened regulatory scrutiny and supervision in recent years.

The following summary provides a general overview of our primary regulators and related bodies and a description of their oversight with respect to us and our subsidiaries, including key regulations or initiatives that we are currently, or may in the future be, subject to. Such regulations and initiatives, both in the United States and abroad, are discussed in more detail following the summary.

U.S. FEDERAL REGULATION

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (FRB): Oversees and regulates financial institutions, including nonbank systemically important financial institutions (nonbank SIFIs). We are currently subject to the FRB’s examination, supervision and enforcement authority, and certain reporting requirements, as a nonbank SIFI.

Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC): Charters, regulates and supervises all national banks and federal savings associations. The OCC supervises and regulates AIG Federal Savings Bank, our trust-only federal thrift subsidiary.

Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC): Oversees and regulates the U.S. securities and security-based swap markets, U.S. mutual funds, U.S. broker-dealers and U.S. investment advisors. Principal regulator of the mutual funds offered by our broker-dealer subsidiaries. The SEC is in the process of implementing rules and regulations governing reporting, clearing, execution and margin requirements for security-based swaps entered into within the U.S or by U.S. persons. Our security-based swap activities are likely to be subject to certain of these rules and regulations.  

Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC): Oversees and regulates the U.S. swap, commodities and futures markets. The CFTC has implemented and is continuing to implement rules and regulations governing reporting, clearing, execution, margin and other requirements for swaps entered into within the U.S. or involving U.S. persons. Our swap activities are subject to certain of these rules and regulations.

Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank): Dodd-Frank has effected comprehensive changes to financial services regulation and subjects us, or may subject us, as applicable, to additional federal regulation, including:

   enhanced prudential standards for nonbank SIFIs (including minimum leverage and risk-based capital requirements, capital planning, stress tests, liquidity requirements, corporate governance requirements, contingent capital requirements, counterparty credit limits, an early remediation regime process and resolution planning);

   limitations on proprietary trading or covered fund activities, if the FRB decides to impose certain elements of Section 619 of Dodd-Frank (referred to as the “Volcker Rule”) on nonbank SIFIs;

   financial sector concentration limits; and

   increased regulation and restrictions on derivatives markets and transactions.

In an Executive Order signed on February 3, 2017, the President of the United States directed the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with federal financial regulators, to assess all laws, rules and policies that regulate the U.S. financial system, including requirements put into place under Dodd-Frank since 2010, with a view to producing a plan to revise them as necessary.  We are closely following these developments.

 

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          9

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

U.S. STATE REGULATION

 

State Insurance Regulators: Our insurance subsidiaries are subject to regulation and supervision by the states and other jurisdictions in which they do business. Regulation is generally derived from statutes that delegate supervisory and regulatory powers to a state insurance regulator, and primarily relates to the insurer’s financial condition, corporate conduct and market conduct activities.

NAIC Standards: The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is a standard-setting and regulatory support organization created and governed by the chief insurance regulators from the 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories. The NAIC itself is not a regulator, but, with assistance from the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review and coordinate regulatory oversight.

 

FOREIGN REGULATION

Financial Stability Board (FSB): The FSB consists of representatives of national financial authorities of the G20 countries. The FSB itself is not a regulator but is focused primarily on promoting international financial stability. It does so by coordinating the work of national financial authorities and international standard-setting bodies as well as developing and promoting the implementation of regulatory, supervisory and other financial policies.

International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS): The IAIS represents insurance regulators and supervisors of more than 200 jurisdictions   (including regions and states) in nearly 140 countries and seeks to promote globally consistent insurance industry supervision. The IAIS itself is not a regulator, but one of its activities is to develop insurance regulatory standards for use by local authorities across the globe. The FSB has charged the IAIS with developing a framework for measuring systemic risks posed by insurance groups. Based on the IAIS’ assessment methodology for identifying global systemically important insurers (G-SIIs), the FSB has identified nine G-SIIs, including us. This designation may subject us to a policy framework for G-SIIs that includes recovery and resolution planning, enhanced group-wide supervision, enhanced liquidity and systemic risk management planning, and group-wide capital standards, including higher loss absorbency (HLA) capital.

European Union (EU): The European Parliament issues Directives on a wide range of topics that impact financial services. Insurance companies operating in the EU are subject to the Solvency II framework. The Prudential Regulatory Authority (PRA), the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) prudential regulator, is our lead EU prudential supervisor. The UK’s Financial Conduct Authority has oversight of AIG’s operations for consumer protection and competition matters within the UK. In addition, financial companies that operate in the EU are subject to a range of regulations enforced by the national regulators in each member state in which that firm operates. The EU has also established a set of regulatory requirements under the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) that include, among other things, risk mitigation, risk management, regulatory reporting and clearing requirements.

Regulation of Foreign Insurance Company Subsidiaries: Generally, our subsidiaries operating in foreign jurisdictions must satisfy local regulatory requirements. Our foreign operations are also regulated in various jurisdictions with respect to currency, policy language and terms, advertising, amount and type of security deposits, amount and type of reserves, amount and type of capital to be held, amount and type of local investment and the share of profits to be returned to policyholders on participating policies. Some foreign countries also regulate rates on various types of policies.

Federal Reserve REGULATION AND Supervision

Due to the determination of the Financial Stability Oversight Council (Council) that AIG should be regulated by the FRB as a nonbank SIFI, we have been since July 2013 subject to the FRB’s examination, supervision and enforcement authority, and certain reporting requirements. Dodd-Frank requires that the Council reevaluate its determination annually. The Council’s annual reevaluations to date have not resulted in a change to our nonbank SIFI status, and we remain regulated by the FRB. However, in light of the recent change in administration in the United States, there is considerable uncertainty as to the future of federal regulation of nonbank SIFIs. Depending on developments, important elements of AIG’s supervision at the federal level, including those described in this section and the following section, Other Effects of Dodd-Frank, may change significantly.

As a nonbank SIFI, we anticipate we may be subject to:

     stress tests to determine whether, on a consolidated basis, we have the capital necessary to absorb losses due to adverse economic conditions;

     enhanced prudential standards, including new group-wide requirements relating to risk-based capital, leverage, liquidity and credit exposure, as well as overall risk management requirements; and

     an early remediation regime process to be administered by the FRB.

On June 3, 2016, the FRB issued for public comment a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) on enhanced prudential standards that would require insurer nonbank SIFIs to comply with corporate governance and risk-management standards and liquidity risk management standards.  These proposed standards build on the FRB’s current guidance for large financial institutions supervised by the FRB and have been tailored to insurance companies.  The comment period has closed, and we anticipate that the FRB will adopt a final rule in the future after evaluating all comments received. Under the proposal, the insurer nonbank SIFIs would have at least twelve months to comply. 

On June 3, 2016, the FRB released for public comment an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR) outlining two conceptual insurance group capital frameworks that could apply to insurance groups supervised by the FRB - a building block approach, proposed for insurance institutions that are savings and loan holding companies or bank holding companies by virtue of owning

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            10 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

depository institutions, and a consolidated approach for insurer nonbank SIFIs.  In general, the consolidated approach would consolidate an insurance company’s assets and insurance liabilities into risk segments tailored to account for the liability structure and unique features of the insurance company, apply risk factors to each segment and then set minimum capital requirements. The ANPR does not provide details on specific risk segments, risk factors, capital adequacy ratios and other important elements that could be applied to us under the consolidated approach, and we cannot predict how such an approach would affect our business, results of operations, financial condition or capital requirements. The comment period has closed and we anticipate that the FRB will issue a NPR after evaluating all comments received.

As part of its general prudential supervisory powers, the FRB has the authority to limit our ability to conduct activities that would otherwise be permissible for us to engage in if we do not satisfy certain requirements. With regard to acquisitions, Dodd-Frank would require us to obtain the prior authorization of the FRB if we sought to acquire a stake in certain financial companies. We are also subject to management interlock prohibitions and a requirement to maintain a plan for rapid and orderly resolution in the event of severe financial distress. We cannot predict how the FRB’s continuing exercise of its general supervisory authority over us as a nonbank SIFI will develop, although the FRB could, as a prudential matter, for example, limit our ability to pay dividends, repurchase shares of AIG Common Stock or to acquire or enter into other businesses. We cannot predict with certainty the requirements of the regulations ultimately adopted or how or whether Dodd-Frank and such regulations will affect the financial markets generally or impact our businesses, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition, capital adequacy position or credit ratings.

Furthermore, if the Council were to make an additional separate determination that we pose a “grave threat” to U.S. financial stability, we would be required to maintain a debt-to-equity ratio of no more than 15:1 and the FRB may impose additional restrictions.

Other Effects of Dodd-Frank

In addition, Dodd-Frank may also have the following effects on us:

     As a nonbank SIFI, we are currently required to provide on an annual basis to the FRB and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) a plan for our rapid and orderly resolution in the event of material financial distress or failure, which must provide a detailed resolution strategy and analyses of our material entities, organizational structure, interconnections and interdependencies, and management information systems.  In accordance with an extension of the annual deadline provided by the FRB and FDIC to 38 firms including AIG in 2016, we plan to submit our next resolution plan to regulators on December 31, 2017.  If the FRB and FDIC jointly were to determine, based on their review of the plan, that it is not credible or would not facilitate our orderly resolution under Title 11 of the United States Code (the Bankruptcy Code), the FRB and FDIC may require us to re-submit an amended plan.  If the re-submitted plan also were to fail to meet regulatory expectations, the FRB and FDIC may exercise their authority under Dodd-Frank to impose more stringent capital, leverage, or liquidity requirements, restrict our growth, activities, or operations, require us to divest assets and operations, or otherwise increase their level of supervision of us.

     The Council may recommend that state insurance regulators or other regulators apply new or heightened standards and safeguards for activities or practices that we and other insurers or other financial services companies engage in.

     Title II of Dodd-Frank (Orderly Liquidation Authority) provides that a financial company whose largest United States subsidiary is an insurer may be subject to a special orderly liquidation process outside the Bankruptcy Code. That process is to be administered by the FDIC upon a determination that the company is in default or in danger of default, is not likely to attract private sector alternatives to default and is not suitable for resolution under the Bankruptcy Code. Our U.S. insurance subsidiaries, however, would be subject to rehabilitation and liquidation proceedings under state insurance law.

     Title VII of Dodd-Frank provides for significantly increased regulation of and restrictions on derivatives markets and transactions that have affected and, as additional regulations come into effect, could affect various activities of AIG and its insurance and financial services subsidiaries, including (i) regulatory reporting for swaps and security-based swaps, (ii) mandated clearing through central counterparties and execution through regulated swap execution facilities for certain swaps and security-based swaps and (iii) margin and collateral requirements.  Although the CFTC has finalized many of its requirements, the SEC has yet to finalize the majority of rules comprising its security-based swap regulatory regime.

     Similar regulations have been proposed or adopted outside the United States.  For instance, the EU has also established a set of new regulatory requirements for EU derivatives activities under EMIR. These requirements include, among other things, various risk mitigation, risk management, margin posting and regulatory reporting requirements that have already become effective and clearing requirements that were outlined in EU delegated legislation at the end of 2015 and are phased in over three years. These requirements could result in increased administrative costs with respect to our EU derivatives activities and overlapping or inconsistent regulation depending on the ultimate application of cross-border regulatory requirements between and among U.S. and non-U.S. jurisdictions.

     Dodd-Frank mandated a study to determine whether stable value contracts should be included in the definition of "swap." If that study concludes that stable value contracts are swaps, Dodd-Frank authorizes certain federal regulators to determine whether an exemption from the definition of a swap for stable value contracts is appropriate and in the public interest. Certain of our affiliates

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          11

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

participate in the stable value contract business. We cannot predict what regulations might emanate from the aforementioned study or be promulgated applicable to this business in the future.

     Dodd-Frank established the Federal Insurance Office (FIO) within the United States Department of the Treasury (Department of the Treasury) headed by a director appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury. The director of the FIO performs various public policy functions with respect to insurance, including serving as a non-voting member of the Council.

     On November 20, 2015, the Department of the Treasury, assisted by the FIO, and the United States Trade Representative announced their intention to negotiate an agreement between the U.S. and the EU regarding prudential measures with respect to insurance and reinsurance. On January 13, 2017, the U.S. and EU announced that they had successfully negotiated terms of such an agreement. For additional information, see Regulation – Other Regulatory Developments. 

     Dodd-Frank established the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) within the FRB to regulate consumer financial products and services offered primarily for personal, family or household purposes. Insurance products and services are not within the CFPB's general jurisdiction. Broker-dealers and investment advisers are not subject to the CFPB's jurisdiction when acting in their registered capacity.   

Dodd-Frank authorizes various assessments on financial companies, including, as applicable to us, fees for our supervision by the FRB and possible assessments to cover the costs of any special resolution of a financial company conducted under Title II.

We cannot predict whether all these actions will become effective or the effect they may have on the financial markets or on our business, results of operations, cash flows, financial condition and credit ratings. However, it is possible that such effect could be materially adverse. See Item 1A. Risk Factors — Regulation for additional information.

Other Regulatory Developments

In addition to the adoption of Dodd-Frank in the United States, regulators and lawmakers around the world are continuing to review the causes of the financial crisis and taking steps to avoid similar problems in the future. In the past few years, a number of jurisdictions in which our subsidiaries conduct business have implemented legislative and regulatory changes consistent with recommendations of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, which conduct periodic Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) reviews to measure local regulatory regimes against the standards set by the IAIS. Examples include updated Insurance Company Ordinances in Hong Kong and consolidated regulation of insurance holding companies by the Financial Services Agency in Japan.

The FSB, consisting of representatives of national financial authorities of the G20 countries, has issued a series of frameworks and recommendations intended to produce significant changes in how financial companies, particularly global systemically important financial institutions, should be regulated. These frameworks and recommendations address such issues as systemic financial risk, financial group supervision, capital and solvency standards, corporate governance including compensation, and a number of related issues associated with responses to the financial crisis. The FSB has directed the IAIS to create standards relative to many of these areas, which go beyond the IAIS’ basic Insurance Core Principles (ICPs). The IAIS is developing ComFrame, a Common Framework for the Supervision of Internationally Active Insurance Groups (IAIGs). ComFrame sets out qualitative and quantitative standards in order to assist supervisors in collectively addressing an IAIG’s activities and risks, identifying and avoiding regulatory gaps and coordinating supervisory activities.  In connection with ComFrame, the IAIS is in the process of developing a risk-based global insurance capital standard (ICS) applicable to IAIGs.  We currently meet the parameters set forth to define an IAIG.  ComFrame standards are expected to be finalized in 2019, and the IAIS is conducting field testing of ComFrame, including the ICS, ahead of that deadline.  It is expected that the ComFrame and ICS standards finally adopted by the IAIS would be ready for adoption by implementing member jurisdictions beginning in 2020.

The IAIS intends G-SIIs to be subject to a policy framework that includes recovery and resolution planning, enhanced group-wide supervision, enhanced liquidity and systemic risk management planning; and group-wide capital standards, including HLA capital. The IAIS’ basic capital requirement (BCR) was endorsed by the FSB in October 2014 and by the G20 countries in November 2014.  The BCR covers all group activities, and we reported our BCR ratios to national authorities on a confidential basis in 2015 and 2016.  The BCR serves as the initial foundation for the application of HLA requirements.  In October 2015, the IAIS announced that it had concluded initial development of the HLA requirements, according to which we reported on a confidential basis to supervisors in 2016. HLA requirements were endorsed by the FSB in September 2015 and by the G20 countries in November 2015. Both the BCR and HLA requirements are calculated for insurance and non-insurance activities.  Ultimately, the G-SII policy framework is expected to be fully implemented by the IAIS by 2019.

The standards discussed above, issued by the FSB and/or the IAIS, are not binding on the United States or other jurisdictions around the world unless and until the appropriate local governmental bodies or regulators adopt appropriate laws and regulations.  At this time it is not known how the IAIS’ frameworks and/or standards might be implemented in the United States and other jurisdictions around the world, or how they might apply to us.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            12 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

Legislation in the EU could also affect our international insurance operations. Solvency II reforms the insurance industry’s solvency framework, including minimum capital and solvency requirements, governance requirements, risk management and public reporting standards. In accordance with Solvency II, in the absence of a decision by the European Commission on whether a supervisory regime outside of the EU is equivalent, Member States may decide either to apply relevant Solvency II requirements to a worldwide insurance group operating in the EU as if it were based in the European Economic Area, or to use “other methods”.

Firms have to apply for a waiver to the appropriate EU regulator in order for the regulator to use “other methods.”  AIG’s UK subsidiary, AIG Europe Limited, applied to the PRA and was granted a waiver for three years beginning in January 2016 (which may be renewed) to allow the PRA to use “other methods.” In order to address the issue of U.S. equivalency with Solvency II as well as other (re)insurance regulatory issues, on November 20, 2015, the U.S. and the EU entered into negotiations on a “covered agreement”.  On January 13, 2017, the U.S. and EU announced they had successfully reached a covered agreement and the agreed text was submitted to the appropriate committees of Congress, starting a 90-day period required by Dodd-Frank after which (and after an additional 7-day notice period) with regard to the U.S. the terms become effective unless disapproved by congressional legislation during those 90 days. In the EU, the agreement is still subject to several steps before becoming effective, including approval by the European Parliament.  The agreement provides that AIG will be supervised at the worldwide group level only by its relevant U.S. insurance supervisors, and that it will not have to satisfy EU group capital, reporting and governance requirements for its worldwide group. It further provides that if the summary risk reports submitted to the supervisory authority of a host jurisdiction expose any serious threat to policyholder protection or financial stability in such host state, the host supervisor may request further information from the insurance group and/or impose preventive or corrective measures with respect to the (re)insurer in its jurisdiction. The EU is applying these group supervision terms provisionally until the date of entry into full force of the agreement. The agreement also seeks to impose equal treatment of U.S. and EU-based reinsurers that meet certain qualifications.  In the U.S., once fully implemented, the agreement requires U.S. states to lift reinsurance collateral requirements on qualifying EU-based reinsurers and provide them equal treatment with U.S. reinsurers or be subject to federal preemption. While this provision does not preclude AIG from continuing to request collateral from an EU reinsurer that is party to a bilateral reinsurance transaction, it is unclear how much collateral AIG will be able to obtain from EU reinsurers going forward. The reinsurance provisions of this agreement are subject to implementation timetables in the U.S. and EU that may delay or even prevent the agreement from being fully implemented. In particular, the U.S. states have been given a period of five years to comply with the reinsurance collateral provisions.  After 42 months, the Federal Government must begin evaluating a potential preemption determination with respect to any state law not in compliance with the aim of assuring full compliance within the five-year timeframe. The agreement may be terminated (following mandatory consultation) by notice from one party to the other effective in 180 days, or at such time as the parties may agree.  It is not known what view the new Congress and new administration may take on the termination or enforcement of the covered agreement.

On June 23, 2016, the UK held a referendum in which a majority voted for the UK to withdraw its membership in the EU, commonly referred to as Brexit. The terms of withdrawal are subject to a formal negotiation period which, as publicly stated by the UK Prime Minister, is expected to be initiated by the end of March 2017 by invoking Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union, and could, by treaty, last up to two years. On January 24, 2017, the Supreme Court (the UK’s highest court) ruled that Parliament must vote whether to approve the UK Government’s plan to invoke Article 50. On January 27, 2017, the Government introduced a bill in Parliament seeking approval to notify the EU of the UK’s intention to withdraw from the EU.  The bill passed a vote in the lower house of Parliament on February 8, 2017 and progressed to the House of Lords. The bill may be approved by the House of Lords as written and sent for royal assent or be amended, which would result in the bill being sent back to the lower house for further consideration. It is not clear at this stage (and may not be for some time) what form the UK’s future relationship with the remaining EU member states will take. We have significant operations and employees in the UK and other EU member states, including AIG Europe Ltd., which enjoys certain benefits based on the UK’s membership in the EU. In order to adapt to Brexit, we may be required to reorganize our operations and legal entity structure in the UK and the EU in a manner that could be less efficient and more expensive.

ERISA Considerations

We provide products and services to certain employee benefit plans that are subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), or the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Internal Revenue Code).  Plans subject to ERISA include pension and profit sharing plans and welfare plans, including health, life and disability plans.  As a result, our activities are subject to the restrictions imposed by ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code, including the requirement under ERISA that fiduciaries must perform their duties solely in the interests of ERISA plan participants and beneficiaries, and that fiduciaries may not cause a covered plan to engage in certain prohibited transactions.  ERISA also provides for civil and criminal penalties and enforcement.

On April 8, 2016, the DOL published its final fiduciary duty rule (the DOL Fiduciary Rule), substantially expanding the definition of fiduciary investment advice. As a result, the circumstances under which financial services providers and financial advisors could be deemed a fiduciary under ERISA or the Internal Revenue Code when providing investment advice with respect to ERISA plans or Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) are greatly expanded. The DOL Fiduciary Rule contains revisions to and adoptions of new

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          13

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

prohibited transaction exemptions under ERISA, including revisions to a prohibited transaction exemption historically available in conjunction with the sale of fixed and variable annuity contracts to ERISA covered plans, commonly referred to as “84-24”, and the adoption of the “best interest contract exemption”.  The initial compliance date of the DOL Fiduciary Rule is April 10, 2017, with full compliance required by January 1, 2018. On February 3, 2017, the new U.S. administration issued a memo requiring the DOL to review the DOL Fiduciary Rule and determine whether it will adversely impact the ability of retirement savers to access information and financial advice. Accordingly, the DOL announced that it would consider legal options for postponing the applicability date of the DOL Fiduciary Rule while the DOL considers the issues raised in the referenced memo. We are closely following the DOL’s pronouncements about further delays to the DOL Fiduciary Rule’s applicability date. For additional information, see Item 7. MD&A — Executive Summary – AIG’s Outlook – Industry and Economic Factors- Department of Labor Fiduciary Rule and Part I, Item 1A. Risk Factors.  

We expect that the regulations applicable to us and our regulated entities will continue to evolve for the foreseeable future.

Regulation of Insurance Subsidiaries

Certain states and other jurisdictions require registration and periodic reporting by insurance companies that are licensed in such jurisdictions and are controlled by other entities. Applicable legislation typically requires periodic disclosure concerning the entity that controls the registered insurer and the other companies in the holding company system and prior approval of intercompany services and transfers of assets, including in some instances payment of dividends by the insurance subsidiary, within the holding company system. Our subsidiaries are registered under such legislation in those jurisdictions that have such requirements.

Our insurance subsidiaries are subject to regulation and supervision by the states and by other jurisdictions in which they do business. Within the United States, the method of such regulation varies but generally has its source in statutes that delegate regulatory and supervisory powers to an insurance official. The regulation and supervision relate primarily to the financial condition of the insurers and their corporate conduct and market conduct activities. This includes approval of policy forms and rates, the standards of solvency that must be met and maintained, including with respect to risk-based capital, the standards on transactions between insurance company subsidiaries and their affiliates, including restrictions and limitations on the amount of dividends or other distributions payable by insurance company subsidiaries to their parent companies, the licensing of insurers and their agents, the nature of and limitations on investments, restrictions on the size of risks that may be insured under a single policy, deposits of securities for the benefit of policyholders, requirements for acceptability of reinsurers, periodic examinations of the affairs of insurance companies, the form and content of reports of financial condition required to be filed, reserves for unearned premiums, losses and other purposes and enterprise risk management and corporate governance requirements. In general, such regulation is for the protection of policyholders rather than the creditors or equity owners of these companies.

In the U.S., the Risk-Based Capital (RBC) formula is designed to measure the adequacy of an insurer's statutory surplus in relation to the risks inherent in its business. Virtually every state has adopted, in substantial part, the RBC Model Law promulgated by the NAIC, which allows states to act upon the results of RBC calculations, and provides for four incremental levels of regulatory action regarding insurers whose RBC calculations fall below specific thresholds. Those levels of action range from the requirement to submit a plan describing how an insurer would regain a specified RBC ratio to a mandatory regulatory takeover of the company. The RBC formula computes a risk-adjusted surplus level by applying discrete factors to various asset, premium and reserve items. These factors are developed to be risk-sensitive so that higher factors are applied to items exposed to greater risk.  The statutory surplus of each of our U.S. based insurance companies exceeded RBC minimum required levels as of December 31, 2016.

If any of our insurance entities fell below prescribed levels of statutory surplus, it would be our intention to provide appropriate capital or other types of support to that entity. For additional information, see Item 7. MD&A — Liquidity and Capital Resources — Liquidity and Capital Resources of AIG Parent and Subsidiaries — Insurance Companies.

The NAIC’s Model Regulation “Valuation of Life Insurance Policies” (Regulation XXX) requires insurers to establish additional statutory reserves for term life insurance policies with long-term premium guarantees and universal life policies with secondary guarantees (ULSGs). NAIC Actuarial Guideline 38 (Guideline AXXX) clarifies the application of Regulation XXX as to these guarantees, including certain ULSGs. See Item 1A – Risk Factors and Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for risks and additional information related to these statutory reserving requirements. In December 2012, the NAIC approved a new valuation manual containing a principle-based approach to life insurance company reserves. Principle-based reserving (PBR) is designed to tailor the reserving process to specific products in an effort to create a principle-based modeling approach to reserving rather than the factor-based approach historically employed. PBR became effective on January 1, 2017, after NAIC’s model Standard Valuation Law was enacted by the requisite number of states representing the required premium volume, replacing Regulation XXX and Guideline AXXX with respect to new life insurance business issued after that date. Two of our domiciliary states (Missouri and Texas) have adopted the regulations necessary to implement PBR. We have up to three years after January 1, 2017 to implement PBR, and have currently elected to defer implementation.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            14 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

The NAIC has adopted revisions to the NAIC Insurance Holding Company System Regulatory Act (the Model Holding Company Act) and the Insurance Holding Company System Model Regulation.  The revised models include provisions authorizing NAIC commissioners to act as global group-wide supervisors for internationally active insurance groups, and the requirement that the ultimate controlling person of a U.S. insurer file an annual enterprise risk report with the lead state of the insurer identifying risks likely to have a material adverse effect upon the financial condition or liquidity of the insurer or its insurance holding company system as a whole. All of the states where AIG has domestic insurers have enacted a version of the revised Model Holding Company Act, including the enterprise risk reporting requirement.

A substantial portion of our business is conducted in foreign countries. The degree of regulation and supervision in foreign jurisdictions varies. Generally, our subsidiaries operating in foreign jurisdictions must satisfy local regulatory requirements; licenses issued by foreign authorities to our subsidiaries are subject to modification or revocation by such authorities, and therefore these subsidiaries could be prevented from conducting business in certain of the jurisdictions where they currently operate.

In addition to licensing requirements, our foreign operations are also regulated in various jurisdictions with respect to currency, policy language and terms, advertising, amount and type of security deposits, amount and type of reserves, amount and type of capital to be held, amount and type of local investment and the share of profits to be returned to policyholders on participating policies. Some foreign countries regulate rates on various types of policies. Certain countries have established reinsurance institutions, wholly or partially owned by the local government, to which admitted insurers are obligated to cede a portion of their business on terms that may not always allow foreign insurers, including our subsidiaries, full compensation. In some countries, regulations governing constitution of technical reserves and remittance balances may hinder remittance of profits and repatriation of assets.

See Item 7. MD&A — Liquidity and Capital Resources — Regulation and Supervision and Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          15

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

ITEM 1 | Business

 

 

Available Information about AIG

Our corporate website is www.aig.com. We make available free of charge, through the Investor Information section of our corporate website, the following reports (and related amendments as filed with the SEC) as soon as reasonably practicable after such materials are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC:

     Annual Reports on Form 10-K

     Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q

     Current Reports on Form 8-K

     Proxy Statements on Schedule 14A, as well as other filings with the SEC

Also available on our corporate website:

     Charters for Board Committees: Audit, Nominating and Corporate Governance, Compensation and Management Resources, Risk and Capital, Regulatory, Compliance and Public Policy, and Technology Committees

     Corporate Governance Guidelines (which include Director Independence Standards

     Director, Executive Officer and Senior Financial Officer Code of Business Conduct and Ethics (we will post on our website any amendment or waiver to this Code within the time period required by the SEC)

     Employee Code of Conduct

     Related‑Party Transactions Approval Policy

Except for the documents specifically incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K, information contained on our website or that can be accessed through our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Reference to our website is made as an inactive textual reference.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            16 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

ITEM 1A | Risk Factors  

Investing in AIG involves risk. In deciding whether to invest in AIG, you should carefully consider the following risk factors. Any of these risk factors could have a significant or material adverse effect on our businesses, results of operations, financial condition or liquidity. They could also cause significant fluctuations and volatility in the trading price of our securities. Readers should not consider any descriptions of these factors to be a complete set of all potential risks that could affect AIG. These factors should be considered carefully together with the other information contained in this report and the other reports and materials filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Further, many of these risks are interrelated and could occur under similar business and economic conditions, and the occurrence of certain of them may in turn cause the emergence or exacerbate the effect of others. Such a combination could materially increase the severity of the impact of these risks on our businesses, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.

MARKET CONDITIONS

Difficult conditions in the global capital markets and the economy may materially and adversely affect our businesses, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity. Our businesses are highly dependent on the economic environment, both in the U.S. and around the world. Extreme market events have at times led, and could in the future lead, to a lack of liquidity, highly volatile markets, a steep depreciation in asset values across all classes, an erosion of investor and public confidence, and a widening of credit spreads. Concerns and events beyond our control, such as U.S. fiscal and monetary policy, oil prices, slowing growth in China and the Euro-Zone economies, the U.S. housing market, concerns about European sovereign debt risk and the European banking industry and declines in prices in the high yield market and the resultant impact on certain funds have in the past, and may in the future, adversely affect liquidity, increase volatility, decrease asset prices, erode confidence and lead to wider credit spreads. Difficult economic conditions could also result in increased unemployment and a severe decline in business across a wide range of industries and regions. These market and economic factors could have a material adverse effect on our businesses, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.

Under difficult economic or market conditions, we could experience reduced demand for our products and an elevated incidence of claims, increased policy cancellations and lapses or surrenders of policies. Contract holders may choose to defer or cease paying insurance premiums. Other ways in which we could be negatively affected by economic conditions include, but are not limited to:

     declines in the valuation and performance of our investment portfolio, including declines attributable to rapid increases in interest rates;

     increased credit losses;

     declines in the value of other assets;

     impairments of goodwill and other long-lived assets;

     additional statutory capital requirements;

     limitations on our ability to recover deferred tax assets;

     a decline in new business levels and renewals;

     a decline in insured values caused by a decrease in activity at client organizations;

     an increase in liability for future policy benefits due to loss recognition on certain long-duration insurance contracts;

     higher borrowing costs and more limited availability of credit;

     an increase in policy surrenders and cancellations; and

     a write-off of deferred policy acquisition costs (DAC).

Sustained low interest rates, or rapidly increasing interest rates, may materially and adversely affect our profitability. Recent periods have been characterized by low interest rates relative to historical levels. Sustained low interest rates can negatively affect the performance of our investment securities and reduce the level of investment income earned on our investment portfolios. If a low interest rate environment persists, we may experience lower investment income growth. Due to practical and capital markets limitations, we may not be able to fully mitigate our interest rate risk by matching exposure of our assets relative to our liabilities. Continued low interest rates could also impair our ability to earn the returns assumed in the pricing and the reserving for our products at the time they were sold and issued. Changes in interest rates may be correlated with inflation trends, which would impact our loss trends.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          17

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

On the other hand, in periods of rapidly increasing interest rates, we may not be able to replace, in a timely manner, the investments in our general account with higher yielding investments needed to fund the higher crediting rates necessary to keep interest rate sensitive products competitive. Therefore, we may have to accept a lower credit spread and, thus, lower profitability or face a decline in sales and greater loss of existing contracts and related assets. In addition, policy loans, surrenders and withdrawals may tend to increase as policyholders seek investments with higher perceived returns as interest rates rise. This process may result in cash outflows requiring that we sell investments at a time when the prices of those investments are adversely affected by the increase in interest rates. This may result in realized investment losses. An increase in interest rates could also have a material adverse effect on the value of our investment portfolio, for example, by decreasing the estimated fair values of the fixed income securities that comprise a substantial portion of our investment portfolio. This in turn could adversely affect our ability to realize our deferred tax assets.

Investment Portfolio, Concentration of Investments, Insurance and other Exposures

The performance and value of our investment portfolio are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including changes in interest rates.  Our investment securities are subject to market risks and uncertainties. In particular, interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors, including monetary and fiscal policy, domestic and international economic and political issues and other factors beyond our control. Changes in monetary policy or other factors may cause interest rates to rise, which would adversely affect the value of the fixed income securities that we hold and could adversely affect our ability to sell these securities. In addition, the evaluation of available-for-sale securities for other-than-temporary impairments, which may occur if interest rates rise, is a quantitative and qualitative process that is subject to significant management judgment. For a sensitivity analysis of our exposure to certain market risk factors, see Item 7. MD&A – Enterprise Risk Management – Market Risk Management. Furthermore, our alternative investment portfolio includes investments for which changes in fair value are reported through operating income and are therefore subject to significant volatility.  In an economic downturn or declining market, the reduction in our investment income due to decreases in the fair value of alternative investments could have a material adverse effect on operating income.

Our investment portfolio is concentrated in certain segments of the economy. Our results of operations and financial condition have in the past been, and may in the future be, adversely affected by the degree of concentration in our investment portfolio. We have significant exposure in real estate and real estate-related securities, including residential mortgage-backed, commercial mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities and commercial mortgage loans. We also have significant exposures to financial institutions and, in particular, to money center and global banks; certain industries, such as energy and utilities; U.S. state and local government issuers and authorities; and Euro Zone financial institutions, governments and corporations. Events or developments that have a negative effect on any particular industry, asset class, group of related industries or geographic region may adversely affect our investments to the extent they are concentrated in such segments. Our ability to sell assets concentrated in such areas may be limited.

Concentration of our insurance and other risk exposures may have adverse effects. We may be exposed to risks as a result of concentrations in our insurance policies, derivatives and other obligations that we undertake for customers and counterparties. We manage these concentration risks by monitoring the accumulation of our exposures to factors such as exposure type, industry, geographic region, counterparty and other factors. We also seek to use reinsurance, hedging and other arrangements to limit or offset exposures that exceed the limits we wish to retain. In certain circumstances, however, these risk management arrangements may not be available on acceptable terms or may prove to be ineffective for certain exposures. Also, our exposure for certain single risk coverages and other coverages may be so large that adverse experience compared to our expectations may have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations or result in additional statutory capital requirements for our subsidiaries. Also see Item 7. MD&A – Business Segment Operations – Commercial Insurance – Business Strategy and – Commercial Insurance – Outlook – Industry and Economic Factors.  

Our valuation of investment securities may include methodologies, estimations and assumptions that are subject to differing interpretations and could result in changes to investment valuations that may materially adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity. During periods of market disruption, it may be difficult to value certain of our investment securities if trading becomes less frequent and/or market data becomes less observable. There may be cases where certain assets in normally active markets with significant observable data become inactive with insufficient observable data due to the financial environment or market conditions in effect at that time. As a result, valuations may include inputs and assumptions that are less observable or require greater estimation and judgment as well as valuation methods that are more complex. These values may not be realized in a market transaction, may not reflect the value of the asset and may change very rapidly as market conditions change and valuation assumptions are modified. Decreases in value and/or an inability to realize that value in a market transaction or secured lending transaction may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            18 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

Reserves and Exposures

Insurance liabilities are difficult to predict and may exceed the related reserves for losses and loss expenses. We regularly review the adequacy of the established loss reserves and conduct extensive analyses of our reserves during the year. Our loss reserves, however, may develop adversely. Estimation of ultimate net losses, loss expenses and loss reserves is a complex process, particularly for long-tail liability lines of business. These lines include, but are not limited to, general liability, commercial automobile liability, environmental, workers' compensation, excess casualty and crisis management coverages, insurance and risk management programs for large corporate customers and other customized structured insurance products, as well as excess and umbrella liability, errors and omissions, products liability, programs and specialty. There is also greater uncertainty in establishing reserves with respect to new business, particularly new business that is generated with respect to more recently introduced product lines. In these cases, there is less historical experience or knowledge and less data upon which the actuaries can rely. Estimating reserves is further complicated by unexpected claims or unintended coverages that emerge due to changing conditions. These emerging issues may increase the size or number of claims beyond our underwriting intent and may not become apparent for many years after a policy is issued.

While we use a number of analytical reserve development techniques to project future loss development, reserves have been and may be significantly affected by changes in loss cost trends or loss development factors that were relied upon in setting the reserves. For example, in the fourth quarters of 2016 and 2015, we recorded net charges of $5.6 billion and $3.6 billion, respectively, to strengthen our Property Casualty Insurance Companies' loss reserves, reflecting adverse development in classes of business with long reporting tails, primarily in casualty, U.S. financial lines and run-off lines. These changes in loss cost trends or loss development factors could be due to changes in actual versus expected claims and losses, difficulties in predicting changes, such as changes in inflation, unemployment duration, or other social or economic factors affecting claims, including the judicial environment. Any deviation in loss cost trends or in loss development factors might not be identified for an extended period of time after we record the initial loss reserve estimates for any accident year or number of years. For a further discussion of our loss reserves, see Item 7. MD&A — Critical Accounting Estimates — Insurance Liabilities — Loss Reserves and Insurance Reserves — Loss Reserves and Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements

Our consolidated results of operations, liquidity, financial condition and ratings are subject to the effects of natural and man-made catastrophic events. Events such as hurricanes, windstorms, flooding, earthquakes, wildfires, solar storms, acts of terrorism, explosions and fires, cyber-crimes, product defects, pandemic and other highly contagious diseases, mass torts and other catastrophes have adversely affected our business in the past and could do so in the future. In addition, we recognize the scientific consensus that climate change is a reality of increasing concern, indicated by higher concentrations of greenhouse gases, a warming atmosphere and ocean, diminished snow and ice, and sea level rise. We understand that climate change potentially poses a serious financial threat to society as a whole, with implications for the insurance industry in areas such as catastrophe risk perception, pricing and modeling assumptions. Because there is significant variability associated with the impacts of climate change, we cannot predict how physical, legal, regulatory and social responses may impact our business.   

Such catastrophic events, and any relevant regulations, could expose us to:

     widespread claim costs associated with property, workers’ compensation, A&H, business interruption and mortality and morbidity claims;

     loss resulting from a decline in the value of our invested assets;

     limitations on our ability to recover deferred tax assets;

     loss resulting from actual policy experience that is adverse compared to the assumptions made in product pricing;

     declines in value and/or losses with respect to companies and other entities whose securities we hold and counterparties we transact business with and have credit exposure to, including reinsurers, and declines in the value of investments; and

     significant interruptions to our systems and operations.

Catastrophic events are generally unpredictable.  Our exposure to catastrophes depends on various factors, including the frequency and severity of the catastrophes, the rate of inflation and the value and geographic or other concentrations of insured companies and individuals. Vendor models and proprietary assumptions and processes that we use to manage catastrophe exposure may prove to be ineffective due to incorrect assumptions or estimates. 

In addition, legislative and regulatory initiatives and court decisions following major catastrophes could require us to pay the insured beyond the provisions of the original insurance policy and may prohibit the application of a deductible, resulting in inflated catastrophe claims.

For further details on potential catastrophic events, including a sensitivity analysis of our exposure to certain catastrophes, see Item 7. MD&A — Enterprise Risk Management — Insurance Risks

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          19

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

Interest rate fluctuations, increased lapses and surrenders, declining investment returns and other events may require our subsidiaries to accelerate the amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs (DAC) and record additional liabilities for future policy benefits. We incur significant costs in connection with acquiring new and renewal insurance business. DAC represents deferred costs that are incremental and directly related to the successful acquisition of new business or renewal of existing business. The recovery of these costs is generally dependent upon the future profitability of the related business, but DAC amortization varies based on the type of contract. For long-duration traditional business, DAC is generally amortized in proportion to premium revenue and varies with lapse experience.  Actual lapses in excess of expectations can result in an acceleration of DAC amortization.

DAC for investment-oriented products is generally amortized in proportion to estimated gross profits.  Estimated gross profits are affected by a number of assumptions, including current and expected interest rates, net investment income and spreads, net realized capital gains and losses, fees, surrender rates, mortality experience and equity market returns and volatility.  If actual and/or future estimated gross profits are less than originally expected, then the amortization of these costs would be accelerated in the period the actual experience is known and would result in a charge to income.  For example, if interest rates rise rapidly and significantly, customers with policies that have interest crediting rates below the current market may seek competing products with higher returns and we may experience an increase in surrenders and withdrawals of life and annuity contracts, resulting in a decrease in future profitability and an acceleration of the amortization of DAC.

We also periodically review products for potential loss recognition events, principally insurance-oriented products.  This review involves estimating the future profitability of in-force business and requires significant management judgment about assumptions including mortality, morbidity, persistency, maintenance expenses, and investment returns, including net realized capital gains (losses). If actual experience or estimates result in projected future losses, we may be required to amortize any remaining DAC and record additional liabilities through a charge to policyholder benefit expense, which could negatively affect our results of operations.  For further discussion of DAC and future policy benefits, see Item 7. MD&A — Critical Accounting Estimates and Notes 9 and  13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements

Reinsurance may not be available or affordable and may not be adequate to protect us against losses. Our subsidiaries are major purchasers of reinsurance and we use reinsurance as part of our overall risk management strategy. While reinsurance does not discharge our subsidiaries from their obligation to pay claims for losses insured under our policies, it does make the reinsurer liable to them for the reinsured portion of the risk. For this reason, reinsurance is an important tool to manage transaction and insurance line risk retention and to mitigate losses from catastrophes. Market conditions beyond our control determine the availability and cost of reinsurance. For example, reinsurance may be more difficult or costly to obtain after a year with a large number of major catastrophes. We may, at certain times, be forced to incur additional expenses for reinsurance or may be unable to obtain sufficient reinsurance on acceptable terms. In the latter case, we would have to accept an increase in exposure to risk, reduce the amount of business written by our subsidiaries or seek alternatives in line with our risk limits.

Additionally, we are exposed to credit risk with respect to our subsidiaries’ reinsurers to the extent the reinsurance receivable is not secured by collateral or does not benefit from other credit enhancements. We also bear the risk that a reinsurer may be unwilling to pay amounts we have recorded as reinsurance recoverable for any reason, including that (i) the terms of the reinsurance contract do not reflect the intent of the parties of the contract or there is a disagreement between the parties as to their intent, (ii) the terms of the contract cannot be legally enforced, (iii) the terms of the contract are interpreted by a court or arbitration panel differently than intended, (iv) the reinsurance transaction performs differently than we anticipated due to a flawed design of the reinsurance structure, terms or conditions, or (v) a change in laws and regulations, or in the interpretation of the laws and regulations, materially impacts a reinsurance transaction. The insolvency of one or more of our reinsurers, or inability or unwillingness to make timely payments under the terms of our contracts, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and liquidity.

Additionally, the use of reinsurance placed in the capital markets, such as through catastrophe bonds, may not provide the same levels of protection as traditional reinsurance transactions. Any disruption, volatility and uncertainty in the catastrophe bond market, such as following a major catastrophe event, may limit our ability to access such market on terms favorable to us or at all. Also, to the extent that we intend to use catastrophe bond transactions based on an industry loss index or other non-indemnity trigger rather than on actual losses incurred by us, we could be subject to residual risk. Our inability to obtain adequate reinsurance or other protection could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We currently have limited reinsurance coverage for terrorist attacks.  Further, the availability of private sector reinsurance for terrorism is limited. We rely heavily on the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (TRIPRA), which provides U.S. government risk assistance to the insurance industry to manage the exposure to terrorism incidents in the United States. TRIPRA was reauthorized in January 2015 and is scheduled to expire on December 31, 2020. Under TRIPRA, once our losses for certain acts of terrorism exceed a deductible equal to 20 percent of our commercial property and casualty insurance premiums for covered lines for the prior calendar year, the federal government will reimburse us for losses in excess of our deductible, starting at 85 percent of losses in 2015 (84 percent in 2016), and reducing by one percentage point each year, ending at 80 percent in 2020, up to a total industry program limit of $100 billion. TRIPRA does not cover losses in certain lines of business such as consumer property and

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            20 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

consumer casualty. We also rely on the government sponsored and government arranged terrorism reinsurance programs, including pools, in force in applicable non-U.S. jurisdictions.

For additional information on our reinsurance recoverable, see Item 7. MD&A — Enterprise Risk Management — Insurance Risks — Reinsurance Recoverable.   

LIQUIDITY, CAPITAL AND CREDIT

AIG Parent’s ability to access funds from our subsidiaries is limited. As a holding company, AIG Parent depends on dividends, distributions and other payments from its subsidiaries to fund dividends on AIG Common Stock, to fund repurchases of AIG Common Stock and warrants and to make payments due on its obligations, including its outstanding debt. The majority of our investments are held by our regulated subsidiaries. Our subsidiaries may be limited in their ability to make dividend payments or other distributions, to AIG Parent in the future because of the need to support their own capital levels or because of regulatory limits or rating agency requirements. The inability of our subsidiaries to make payments, dividends or other distributions in an amount sufficient to enable AIG Parent to meet its cash requirements could have an adverse effect on our operations, and on our ability to pay dividends, repurchase AIG Common Stock and warrants or to meet our debt service obligations.

Our internal sources of liquidity may be insufficient to meet our needs. We need liquidity to pay our operating expenses, interest on our debt, maturing debt obligations and to meet capital needs of our subsidiaries. If our liquidity is insufficient to meet our needs, we may at the time need to have recourse to third-party financing, external capital markets or other sources of liquidity, which may not be available or could be prohibitively expensive. The availability and cost of any additional financing at any given time depends on a variety of factors, including general market conditions, the volume of trading activities, the overall availability of credit, regulatory actions and our credit ratings and credit capacity. It is also possible that, as a result of such recourse to external financing, customers, lenders or investors could develop a negative perception of our long- or short-term financial prospects. Disruptions, volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets, and downgrades in our credit ratings, may limit our ability to access external capital markets at times and on terms favorable to us to meet our capital and liquidity needs or prevent our accessing the external capital markets or other financing sources. For a further discussion of our liquidity, see Item 7. MD&A — Liquidity and Capital Resources

AIG Parent’s ability to support our subsidiaries is limited. AIG Parent has in the past and expects to continue to provide capital to our subsidiaries as necessary to maintain regulatory capital ratios, comply with rating agency requirements and meet unexpected cash flow obligations.  If AIG Parent is unable to satisfy a capital need of a subsidiary, the credit rating agencies could downgrade the subsidiary insurer’s financial strength ratings or the subsidiary could become insolvent or, in certain cases, could be seized by its regulator.

Our subsidiaries may not be able to generate cash to meet their needs due to the illiquidity of some of their investments. Our subsidiaries have investments in certain securities that may be illiquid, including certain fixed income securities and certain structured securities, private company securities, investments in private equity funds and hedge funds, mortgage loans, finance receivables and real estate. Collectively, investments in these assets had a fair value of $58 billion at December 31, 2016. Adverse real estate and capital markets, and wider credit spreads, have in the past, and may in the future, materially adversely affect the liquidity of our other securities portfolios, including our residential and commercial mortgage‑related securities portfolios. In the event additional liquidity is required by one or more of our subsidiaries and AIG Parent is unable to provide it, it may be difficult for these subsidiaries to generate additional liquidity by selling, pledging or otherwise monetizing these less liquid investments.

A downgrade in the Insurer Financial Strength ratings of our insurance companies could limit their ability to write or prevent them from writing new business and retaining customers and business. Insurer Financial Strength (IFS) ratings are an important factor in establishing the competitive position of insurance companies. IFS ratings measure an insurance company’s ability to meet its obligations to contract holders and policyholders. High ratings help maintain public confidence in a company’s products, facilitate marketing of products and enhance its competitive position. Downgrades of the IFS ratings of our insurance companies could prevent these companies from selling, or make it more difficult for them to succeed in selling, products and services, or result in increased policy cancellations, lapses and surrenders, termination of assumed reinsurance contracts, or return of premiums. Under credit rating agency policies concerning the relationship between parent and subsidiary ratings, a downgrade in AIG Parent’s credit ratings could result in a downgrade of the IFS ratings of our insurance subsidiaries. Certain rating agencies recently negatively revised the outlook for our IFS ratings, primarily as a result of our reserve strengthening in the fourth quarter of 2016 and related concerns regarding our profitability outlook. We cannot predict what actions rating agencies may take, or what actions we may take in response to the actions of rating agencies, which could adversely affect our business.

A downgrade in our credit ratings could require us to post additional collateral and result in the termination of derivative transactions. Credit ratings estimate a company’s ability to meet its obligations and may directly affect the cost and availability of financing. A downgrade of our long-term debt ratings by the major rating agencies would require us to post additional collateral payments related to derivative transactions to which we are a party, and could permit the termination of these derivative transactions.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          21

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

This could adversely affect our business, our consolidated results of operations in a reporting period or our liquidity. In the event of further downgrades of two notches to our long-term senior debt ratings, AIG would be required to post additional collateral of $106 million, and certain of our counterparties would be permitted to elect early termination of contracts. Certain rating agencies recently negatively revised our credit ratings and ratings outlooks, primarily as a result of our reserve strengthening in the fourth quarter of 2016 and related concerns regarding our profitability outlook. We cannot predict what actions rating agencies may take, or what actions we may take in response to the actions of rating agencies, which could adversely affect our business.

Business and operations

Our restructuring initiatives may not yield our expected reductions in expenses and improvements in operational and organizational efficiency. We may not be able to fully realize the anticipated expense reductions and operational and organizational efficiency improvements we expect to result from our restructuring initiatives. Actual costs to implement these initiatives may exceed our estimates or we may be unable to fully implement these initiatives. The implementation of these initiatives may harm our relationships with customers or employees or our competitive position. The successful implementation of these initiatives has required us and will continue to require us to effect workforce reductions, business rationalizations, systems enhancements, business process outsourcing, business and asset dispositions and other actions, which depend on a number of factors, some of which are beyond our control. If we are unable to realize these anticipated expense reductions and efficiency improvements or if implementing these initiatives harms our relationships with customers or employees or our competitive position, our businesses and results of operations may be adversely affected.

Certain of our products have guarantees that may increase the volatility of our results.  We have offered variable annuity and life insurance products with features that guarantee a certain level of benefits, including guaranteed minimum death benefits (GMDB), guaranteed minimum income benefits (GMIB), guaranteed minimum withdrawal benefits (GMWB), and products with guaranteed interest crediting rates tied to an index. See Enterprise Risk Management – Life Insurance Companies Key Insurance Risks – Variable Annuity Risk Management and Hedging Program for a discussion of market risk management related to these product features.  

Differences between the change in fair value of GMWB embedded derivatives and the related hedging portfolio can be caused by extreme and unanticipated movements in the equity markets, interest rates and market volatility, policyholder behavior and our inability to purchase hedging instruments at prices consistent with the desired risk and return trade-off.  While we believe that our actions have reduced the risks related to guaranteed benefits and guaranteed interest crediting, our exposure may not be fully hedged. We may be liable if counterparties are unable or unwilling to pay, although the majority of our hedging derivative instruments are exchange-traded, exchange-cleared and/or highly collateralized. We also remain exposed to the risk that policyholder behavior and mortality may differ from our assumptions. Finally, while we believe the impact of downturns in equity markets, increased equity volatility or reduced interest rates would be mitigated by our economic hedging program, the occurrence of one or more of these events could result in an increase in the liabilities associated with the guaranteed benefits that is not fully offset by the hedging program, reducing our net income and shareholders’ equity. See Notes 5 and 14 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Item 1 – Business – Regulation, and Item 7. MD&A – Critical Accounting Estimates for more information regarding these products

Indemnity claims could be made against us in connection with divested businesses. We have provided financial guarantees and indemnities in connection with the businesses we have sold, as described in greater detail in Note 16 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.  While we do not currently believe that claims under these indemnities will be material, it is possible that significant indemnity claims could be made against us. If such a claim or claims were successful, it could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows and liquidity. See Note 16 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for more information on these financial guarantees and indemnities.

Our foreign operations expose us to risks that may affect our operations. We provide insurance, investment and other financial products and services to both businesses and individuals in more than 80 countries and jurisdictions. A substantial portion of our business is conducted outside the United States, and we intend to continue to grow business in strategic markets. Operations outside the United States may be affected by regional economic downturns, changes in foreign currency exchange rates, political events or upheaval, nationalization and other restrictive government actions, which could also affect our other operations.

The degree of regulation and supervision in foreign jurisdictions varies. AIG subsidiaries operating in foreign jurisdictions must satisfy local regulatory requirements and it is possible that local licenses may require AIG Parent to meet certain conditions. Licenses issued by foreign authorities to our subsidiaries are subject to modification and revocation. Consequently, our insurance subsidiaries could be prevented from conducting future business in some of the jurisdictions where they currently operate. Adverse actions from any single country could adversely affect our results of operations, depending on the magnitude of the event and our financial exposure at that time in that country.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            22 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

On June 23, 2016, the UK held a referendum in which a majority voted for the UK to withdraw its membership in the EU, commonly referred to as Brexit. The terms of withdrawal are subject to a formal two-year negotiation period which, as publicly stated by the UK Prime Minister, is expected to be initiated by the end of March 2017 by invoking Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union. It is not clear at this stage (and may not be for some time) what form the UK’s future relationship with the remaining EU member states will take. We have significant operations and employees in the UK and other EU member states, including AIG Europe Ltd., which enjoys certain benefits based on the UK’s membership in the EU. In order to adapt to Brexit, we may be required to reorganize our operations and legal entity structure in the UK and the EU in a manner that could be less efficient and more expensive. Brexit has also affected the U.S. dollar/British pound exchange rate, increased the volatility of exchange rates among the Major Currencies, and created volatility in the financial markets, which may continue for some time.

We may experience difficulty in marketing and distributing products through our current and future distribution channels. Although we distribute our products through a wide variety of distribution channels, we maintain relationships with certain key distributors. Distributors have in the past, and may in the future, elect to renegotiate the terms of existing relationships, or reduce or terminate their distribution relationships with us, including for such reasons as industry consolidation of distributors or other industry changes that increase the competition for access to distributors, developments in legislation or regulation that affect our business, adverse developments in our business, adverse rating agency actions or concerns about market-related risks. An interruption in certain key relationships could materially affect our ability to market our products and could have a material adverse effect on our businesses, operating results and financial condition.

In addition, when our products are distributed through unaffiliated firms, we may not be able to monitor or control the manner of their distribution, despite our training and compliance programs. If our products are distributed to customers for whom they are unsuitable or distributed in any other inappropriate manner, we may suffer reputational and other harm to our business.

Significant legal proceedings may adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition. We are party to numerous legal proceedings, including class actions and regulatory and governmental investigations. Due to the nature of these proceedings, the lack of precise damage claims and the type of claims we are subject to, we cannot currently quantify our ultimate or maximum liability for these actions. Developments in these unresolved matters could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial condition or consolidated results of operations for an individual reporting period. Starr International Company, Inc. (SICO) has brought suit against the United States challenging the government’s assistance of AIG, pursuant to which (i) AIG entered into a credit facility with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and (ii) the United States received an approximately 80 percent ownership interest in AIG.  The United States has alleged that AIG is obligated to indemnify the United States for any recoveries in these lawsuits.  A determination that the United States is liable for damages in such suits, together with a determination that AIG is obligated to indemnify the United States for any such damages, could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial condition and results of operations. For a discussion of the SICO litigation and other unresolved matters, see Note 16 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

If we are unable to maintain the availability of our electronic data systems and safeguard the security of our data, our ability to conduct business may be compromised, which could adversely affect our consolidated financial condition or results of operations. We use computer systems to store, retrieve, evaluate and use customer, employee, and company data and information. Some of these systems, in turn, rely upon third-party systems. Our business is highly dependent on our ability to access these systems to perform necessary business functions. These functions include providing insurance quotes, processing premium payments, making changes to existing policies, filing and paying claims, administering variable annuity products and mutual funds, providing customer support and managing our investment portfolios. Systems failures or outages could compromise our ability to perform these functions in a timely manner, which could harm our ability to conduct business and hurt our relationships with our business partners and customers. In the event of a natural disaster, a computer virus, unauthorized access, a terrorist attack, cyber-attack or other disruption inside or outside the U.S., our systems may be inaccessible to our employees, customers or business partners for an extended period of time, and our employees may be unable to perform their duties for an extended period of time if our data or systems are disabled or destroyed. Our systems have in the past been, and may in the future be, subject to unauthorized access, such as physical or electronic break-ins or unauthorized tampering. Like other global companies, we have, from time to time, experienced threats to our data and systems, including malware and computer virus attacks, unauthorized access, systems failures and disruptions. There is no assurance that our security measures will provide fully effective protection from such events.  AIG maintains cyber risk insurance, but this insurance may not cover all costs associated with the consequences of personal, confidential or proprietary information being compromised. In some cases, such unauthorized access may not be immediately detected. This may impede or interrupt our business operations and could adversely affect our consolidated financial condition or results of operations.

In addition, we routinely transmit, receive and store personal, confidential and proprietary information by email and other electronic means. Although we attempt to keep such information confidential, we may be unable to do so in all events, especially with clients, vendors, service providers, counterparties and other third parties who may not have or use appropriate controls to protect personal, confidential or proprietary information. Furthermore, certain of our businesses are subject to compliance with laws and regulations

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          23

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

enacted by U.S. federal and state governments, the European Union or other jurisdictions or enacted by various regulatory organizations or exchanges relating to the privacy and security of the information of clients, employees or others. The compromise of personal, confidential or proprietary information could result in remediation costs, legal liability, regulatory action and reputational harm.

In connection with our restructuring and efficiency initiatives we are evaluating and enhancing systems and creating new systems and processes. Due to the complexity and interconnectedness of our systems and processes, these changes, as well as changes designed to update and enhance our protective measures to address new threats, increase the risk of a system or process failure or the creation of a gap in our security measures. Any such failure or gap could adversely affect our business operations and the advancement of our restructuring initiatives.

Business or asset acquisitions and dispositions may expose us to certain risks. The completion of any announced business or asset acquisition or disposition is subject to risks relating to the receipt of required regulatory approvals, the terms and conditions of regulatory approvals, the occurrence of any event, change or other circumstances that could give rise to the termination of a transaction and the risk that parties may not be willing or able to satisfy the conditions to a transaction. As a result, there can be no assurance that any announced business or asset acquisition or disposition will be completed as contemplated, or at all, or regarding the expected timing of the completion of the acquisition or disposition. Once we complete acquisitions or dispositions, there can be no assurance that we will realize the anticipated benefits of any transaction. For example, the integration of businesses we acquire may not be as successful as we anticipate. Acquisitions involve a number of risks, including operational, strategic, financial, accounting, legal and tax risks. Difficulties in integrating an acquired business may result in the acquired business performing differently than we expected or in our failure to realize anticipated expense-related efficiencies. Our existing businesses could also be negatively impacted by acquisitions. Risks resulting from future acquisitions may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In connection with a business or asset disposition, we may also hold a concentrated position in securities of the acquirer as part of the consideration, which subjects us to risks related to the price of equity securities and our ability to monetize such securities.

REGULATION

Our businesses are heavily regulated and changes in regulation may affect our operations, increase our insurance subsidiary capital requirements or reduce our profitability. 

Our operations generally, and our insurance subsidiaries, in particular, are subject to extensive and potentially conflicting supervision and regulation by national authorities and by the various jurisdictions in which we do business. Supervision and regulation relate to numerous aspects of our business and financial condition. State and foreign regulators also periodically review and investigate our insurance businesses, including AIG-specific and industry-wide practices. The primary purpose of insurance regulation is the protection of our insurance contract holders, and not our investors. The extent of domestic regulation varies, but generally is governed by state statutes. These statutes delegate regulatory, supervisory and administrative authority to state insurance departments.

We strive to maintain all required licenses and approvals. However, our businesses may not fully comply with the wide variety of applicable laws and regulations. The relevant authority’s interpretation of the laws and regulations also may change from time to time. Regulatory authorities have relatively broad discretion to grant, renew or revoke licenses and approvals. If we do not have the required licenses and approvals or do not comply with applicable regulatory requirements, these authorities could preclude or temporarily suspend us from carrying on some or all of our activities or impose substantial fines. Further, insurance regulatory authorities have relatively broad discretion to issue orders of supervision, which permit them to supervise the business and operations of an insurance company.

In the U.S., the RBC formula is designed to measure the adequacy of an insurer’s statutory surplus in relation to the risks inherent in its business. Virtually every state has adopted, in substantial part, the RBC Model Law promulgated by the NAIC, which specifies the regulatory actions the insurance regulator may take if an insurer’s RBC calculations fall below specific thresholds. Those actions range from requiring an insurer to submit a plan describing how it would regain a specified RBC ratio to a mandatory regulatory takeover of the company. Regulators at the state, federal and international levels are also considering the imposition of additional group-wide capital requirements on certain insurance companies designated as systemically important, that may augment state-law RBC standards that apply at the legal entity level, and such capital calculations may be made on bases other than the statutory statements of our insurance subsidiaries. We cannot predict the effect these initiatives may have on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition. See “Our status as a nonbank systemically important financial institution, as well as the enactment of Dodd-Frank, subjects us to substantial additional federal regulation, which may materially and adversely affect our businesses, results of operations and cash flows” and “Actions by foreign governments and regulators could subject us to substantial additional regulation”  below for additional information on increased capital requirements that may be imposed on us.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            24 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

The degree of regulation and supervision in foreign jurisdictions varies. AIG subsidiaries operating in foreign jurisdictions must satisfy local regulatory requirements and it is possible that local licenses may require AIG Parent to meet certain conditions. Licenses issued by foreign authorities to our subsidiaries are subject to modification and revocation. Accordingly, our insurance subsidiaries could be prevented from conducting future business in certain of the jurisdictions where they currently operate. Adverse actions from any single country could adversely affect our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition, depending on the magnitude of the event and our financial exposure at that time in that country.

See Item 1. Business – Regulation for further discussion of our regulatory environment.

Our status as a nonbank systemically important financial institution, as well as the enactment of Dodd-Frank, subjects us to substantial additional federal regulation, which may materially and adversely affect our businesses, results of operations and cash flows. On July 21, 2010, Dodd-Frank, which effects comprehensive changes to the regulation of financial services in the United States, was signed into law. Dodd-Frank directs existing and newly created government agencies and bodies to promulgate regulations implementing the law, which is an ongoing process. However, in light of the recent change in administration in the United States, there is considerable uncertainty as to the future timing and extent of the federal regulation of nonbank systemically important financial institutions and even the appropriateness of federal regulation of them in general might be questioned.

We cannot predict the requirements of the regulations ultimately adopted, the level and magnitude of supervision we may become subject to, or how Dodd-Frank and such regulations will affect the financial markets generally or our businesses, results of operations or cash flows. It is possible that the regulations adopted under Dodd-Frank and our regulation by the FRB as a nonbank SIFI could significantly alter our business practices, limit our ability to engage in capital or liability management, require us to raise additional capital, and impose burdensome and costly requirements and additional costs. Some of the regulations may also affect the perceptions of regulators, customers, counterparties, creditors or investors about our financial strength and could potentially affect our financing costs.

See Item 1. Business – Regulation for further discussion of the details of these regulations as they apply to AIG and its businesses.

Actions by foreign governments and regulators could subject us to substantial additional regulation.   We cannot predict the impact laws and regulations adopted in foreign jurisdictions may have on the financial markets generally or our businesses, results of operations or cash flows.  It is possible such laws and regulations, the impact of our designation as a global systemically important insurer (G-SII), our status as an Internationally Active Insurance Group (IAIG) and certain initiatives by the FSB and the IAIS, including, but not limited to, the application of HLA capital and the ongoing development of an ICS, and implementation of Solvency II in the European Union, may significantly alter our business practices.  They may also limit our ability to engage in capital or liability management, require us to raise additional capital, and impose burdensome requirements and additional costs.  It is possible that the laws and regulations adopted in foreign jurisdictions will differ from one another, and that they could be inconsistent with the laws and regulations of other jurisdictions including the United States.

For further details on these international regulations and their potential impact on AIG and its businesses, see Item 1. Business – Regulation — Other Regulatory Developments.

The USA PATRIOT Act, the Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations and similar laws and regulations that apply to us may expose us to significant penalties. The operations of our subsidiaries are subject to laws and regulations, including, in some cases, the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, which require companies to know certain information about their clients and to monitor their transactions for suspicious activities. Also, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control administers regulations requiring U.S. persons to refrain from doing business, or allowing their clients to do business through them, with certain organizations or individuals on a prohibited list maintained by the U.S. government or with certain countries. The United Kingdom, the European Union and other jurisdictions maintain similar laws and regulations. Although we have instituted compliance programs to address these requirements, there are inherent risks in global transactions.

Attempts to efficiently manage the impact of Regulation XXX and Actuarial Guideline AXXX may fail in whole or in part resulting in an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. The NAIC Model Regulation “Valuation of Life Insurance Policies” (Regulation XXX) requires insurers to establish additional statutory reserves for term life insurance policies with long-term premium guarantees and universal life policies with secondary guarantees. In addition, NAIC Actuarial Guideline 38 (AG 38, also referred to as Guideline AXXX) clarifies the application of Regulation XXX as to certain universal life insurance policies with secondary guarantees.

Our domestic Life Insurance Companies manage the capital impact of statutory reserve requirements under Regulation XXX and Guideline AXXX through reinsurance transactions, to maintain their ability to offer competitive pricing and successfully market such products. If regulations change with respect to our ability to manage the capital impact of certain statutory reserve requirements, our statutory reserve requirements could increase, or our ability to take reserve credit for reinsurance transactions could be reduced or eliminated. As a result, we could be required to increase prices on our products, raise capital to replace the reserve credit provided by

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          25

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

the reinsurance transactions or incur higher expenses to obtain reinsurance, each of which could adversely affect our competitive position, financial condition or results of operations. If our actions to efficiently manage the impact of Regulation XXX or Guideline AXXX on future sales of term and universal life insurance products are not successful, we may incur higher operating costs or our sales of these products may be affected. See Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on statutory reserving requirements under Regulation XXX and Guideline AXXX and our use of reinsurance.

New regulations may affect our businesses, results of operations, financial condition and ability to compete effectively. Legislators and regulators may periodically consider various proposals that may affect our business practices and product designs, how we sell or service certain products we offer, or the profitability of certain of our businesses. New regulations may even affect our ability to conduct certain businesses at all, including proposals relating to restrictions on the type of activities in which financial institutions are permitted to engage and the size of financial institutions. These proposals could also impose additional taxes on a limited subset of financial institutions and insurance companies (either based on size, activities, geography, government support or other criteria). It is uncertain whether and how these and other such proposals would apply to us or our competitors or how they could impact our consolidated results of operations, financial condition and ability to compete effectively.

An “ownership change” could limit our ability to utilize tax loss and credit carryforwards to offset future taxable income. As of December 31, 2016, we had a U.S. federal net operating loss carryforward of approximately $34.6 billion and $4.9 billion in foreign tax credits (tax loss and credit carryforwards). Our ability to use these tax attributes to offset future taxable income may be significantly limited if we experience an “ownership change” as defined in Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code). In general, an ownership change will occur when the percentage of AIG Parent's ownership (by value) of one or more “5-percent shareholders” (as defined in the Code) has increased by more than 50 percent over the lowest percentage owned by such shareholders at any time during the prior three years (calculated on a rolling basis). An entity that experiences an ownership change generally will be subject to an annual limitation on its pre-ownership change tax loss and credit carryforwards equal to the equity value of the corporation immediately before the ownership change, multiplied by the long-term, tax-exempt rate posted monthly by the IRS (subject to certain adjustments). The annual limitation would be increased each year to the extent that there is an unused limitation in a prior year. The limitation on our ability to utilize tax loss and credit carryforwards arising from an ownership change under Section 382 would depend on the value of our equity at the time of any ownership change.  If we were to experience an “ownership change”, it is possible that a significant portion of our tax loss and credit carryforwards could expire before we would be able to use them to offset future taxable income.

On March 9, 2011, our Board adopted our Tax Asset Protection Plan (the Plan) to help protect these tax loss and credit carryforwards, and on December 14, 2016, the Board adopted an amendment to the Plan, extending its expiration date to December 14, 2019. The Board intends to submit the amendment of the Plan to our shareholders for ratification at our 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  At our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, shareholders adopted a protective amendment to our Restated Certificate of Incorporation (Protective Amendment), which is designed to prevent certain transfers of AIG Common Stock that could result in an “ownership change” and currently expires on May 12, 2017.  The Board intends to submit to our shareholders for approval at our 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders an amendment to our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation to adopt a successor to the Protective Amendment that contains substantially the same terms as the Protective Amendment but would expire on the third anniversary of the date of our 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. 

The Plan is designed to reduce the likelihood of an “ownership change” by (i) discouraging any person or group from becoming a 4.99 percent shareholder and (ii) discouraging any existing 4.99 percent shareholder from acquiring additional shares of AIG Common Stock. The Protective Amendment generally restricts any transfer of AIG Common Stock that would (i) increase the ownership by any person to 4.99 percent or more of AIG stock then outstanding or (ii) increase the percentage of AIG stock owned by a Five Percent Stockholder (as defined in the Plan). Despite the intentions of the Plan and the Protective Amendment to deter and prevent an “ownership change”, such an event may still occur. In addition, the Plan and the Protective Amendment may make it more difficult and more expensive to acquire us, and may discourage open market purchases of AIG Common Stock or a non-negotiated tender or exchange offer for AIG Common Stock. Accordingly, the Plan and the Protective Amendment may limit a shareholder’s ability to realize a premium over the market price of AIG Common Stock in connection with any stock transaction.

Changes in tax laws could increase our corporate taxes, reduce our deferred tax assets or make some of our products less attractive to consumers.    Changes in tax laws or their interpretation could negatively impact our business or results.   Some proposed changes could have the effect of increasing our effective tax rate by reducing deductions or increasing income inclusions, such as denying deductions for the purchase of foreign goods and services, possibly including reinsurance, or placing restrictions on interest expense.  Conversely, other changes, such as lowering the U.S. federal corporate tax rate discussed recently in the context of tax reform, could reduce the value of our deferred tax assets and reduce the value of our investments in tax-exempt securities.  In addition, changes in the way foreign taxes can be credited against U.S. taxes, the ways insurance companies calculate and deduct reserves for tax purposes, and impositions of new or changed premium, value added and other indirect taxes could increase our tax expense, thereby reducing earnings.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            26 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

In addition to proposing to change the taxation of corporations in general and insurance companies in particular, the U.S. Government has considered proposals that could tax income earned by customers on certain life insurance and annuity products.  These changes could reduce demand in the U.S. for life insurance and annuity contracts, which would reduce our income due to lower sales of these products or potential increased surrenders of in-force business. Similarly, proposals that lower U.S. individual federal income tax rates or repeal the federal estate tax could also reduce demand in the U.S. for certain life insurance or annuity contracts.

It remains difficult to predict whether or when there will be any tax law changes having a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations, as the impact of broad proposals on our business can vary substantially depending upon the specific changes made and how the changes are implemented by the authorities.

COMPETITION and employees

We face intense competition in each of our businesses. Our businesses operate in highly competitive environments, both domestically and overseas. Our principal competitors are other large multinational insurance organizations, as well as banks, investment banks and other nonbank financial institutions. The insurance industry in particular is highly competitive. Within the U.S., our Property Casualty Insurance Companies compete with other stock companies, specialty insurance organizations, mutual insurance companies and other underwriting organizations. Our Life Insurance Companies compete in the U.S. with life insurance companies and other participants in related financial services fields. Overseas, our subsidiaries compete for business with the foreign insurance operations of large U.S. insurers and with global insurance groups and local companies.

Reductions of our credit ratings or negative publicity may make it more difficult to compete to retain existing customers and to maintain our historical levels of business with existing customers and counterparties. General insurance and life insurance companies compete through a combination of risk acceptance criteria, product pricing, and terms and conditions. Retirement services companies compete through crediting rates and the issuance of guaranteed benefits. A decline in our position as to any one or more of these factors could adversely affect our profitability.

Competition for employees in our industry is intense, and we may not be able to attract and retain the highly skilled people we need to support our business. Our success depends, in large part, on our ability to attract and retain key people. Due to the intense competition in our industry for key employees with demonstrated ability, we may be unable to hire or retain such employees. In addition, we may experience higher than expected employee turnover and difficulty attracting new employees as a result of uncertainty from strategic actions and organizational and operational changes. Losing any of our key people also could have a material adverse effect on our operations given their skills, knowledge of our business, years of industry experience and the potential difficulty of promptly finding qualified replacement employees. Our results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected if we are unsuccessful in attracting and retaining key employees.

Managing key employee succession and retention is critical to our success. We would be adversely affected if we fail to adequately plan for the succession of our senior management and other key employees. While we have succession plans and long-term compensation plans designed to retain our employees, our succession plans may not operate effectively and our compensation plans cannot guarantee that the services of these employees will continue to be available to us.

Employee error and misconduct may be difficult to detect and prevent and may result in significant losses. There have been a number of cases involving fraud or other misconduct by employees in the financial services industry in recent years and we run the risk that employee misconduct could occur. Instances of fraud, illegal acts, errors, failure to document transactions properly or to obtain proper internal authorization, misuse of customer or proprietary information, or failure to comply with regulatory requirements or our internal policies may result in losses and/or reputational damage. It is not always possible to deter or prevent employee misconduct, and the controls that we have in place to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective in all cases.

Third-party vendors we rely upon to provide certain business and administrative services on our behalf may not perform as anticipated, which could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations. We have taken action to reduce coordination costs and take advantage of economies of scale by transitioning multiple functions and services to a small number of third-party providers. We periodically negotiate provisions and renewals of these relationships, and there can be no assurance that such terms will remain acceptable to us or such third parties. If such third-party providers experience disruptions or do not perform as anticipated, or we experience problems with a transition to a third-party provider, we may experience operational difficulties, an inability to meet obligations (including, but not limited to, policyholder obligations), a loss of business and increased costs, or suffer other negative consequences, all of which may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

ESTIMATES AND ASSUMPTIONS

Estimates used in the preparation of financial statements and modeled results used in various areas of our business may differ materially from actual experience.  Our financial statements are prepared in conformity with U.S. Generally Accepted

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          27

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 1A |  Risk Factors

 

 

Accounting Principles (U.S. GAAP), which requires the application of accounting policies that often involve a significant degree of judgment. The accounting policies that we consider most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions, and therefore may be viewed as critical accounting estimates, are described in Item 7. MD&A — Critical Accounting Estimates. These accounting estimates require the use of assumptions, some of which are highly uncertain at the time of estimation. These estimates are based on judgment, current facts and circumstances, and, when applicable, internally developed models. Therefore, actual results could differ from these estimates, possibly in the near term, and could have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.

In addition, we employ models to price products, calculate reserves and value assets, as well as evaluate risk and determine capital requirements, among other uses. These models rely on estimates and projections that are inherently uncertain, may use incomplete, outdated or incorrect data or assumptions and may not operate properly. As our businesses continue to expand and evolve, the number and complexity of models we employ has grown, increasing our exposure to error in the design, implementation or use of models, including the associated input data, controls and assumptions and the controls we have in place to mitigate their risk may not be effective in all cases.

Changes in accounting principles and financial reporting requirements could impact our reported results of operations and our reported financial position.  Our financial statements are subject to the application of U.S. GAAP, which is periodically revised.   Accordingly, from time to time, we are required to adopt new or revised accounting standards issued by recognized authoritative bodies, including the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). The impact of accounting pronouncements that have been issued but are not yet required to be implemented is disclosed in Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.  

The FASB and International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) have ongoing projects to revise accounting standards for insurance contracts.  The FASB has focused on disclosures for short-duration insurance contracts, which primarily relate to our property casualty products, and on targeted improvements to accounting measurements and disclosures for long-duration insurance contracts, which primarily relate to our life and annuity products.  The IASB continues to contemplate significant changes to accounting measurements for both short and long-duration insurance contracts. While the final resolution of changes to U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards pursuant to these projects remains unclear, changes to the manner in which we account for insurance products could have a significant impact on our future financial reports, operations, capital management and business.  Further, the adoption of a new insurance contracts standard as well as other future accounting standards could have a material effect on our reported results of operations and reported financial condition.

Changes in our assumptions regarding the discount rate, expected rate of return, and expected compensation for our pension and other postretirement benefit plans may result in increased expenses and reduce our profitability.  We determine our pension and other postretirement benefit plan costs based on assumed discount rates, expected rates of return on plan assets, expected increases in compensation levels and trends in health care costs. Changes in these assumptions, including from the impact of a sustained low interest rate environment or rapidly rising interest rates, may result in increased expenses and reduce our profitability. See Note 21 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further details on our pension and postretirement benefit plans.

 

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            28 


TABLE OF CONTENTS  

 

 

ITEM 1B | Unresolved Staff Comments

There are no material unresolved written comments that were received from the SEC staff 180 days or more before the end of our fiscal year relating to periodic or current reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

ITEM 2 | Properties 

We operate from approximately 180 offices in the United States and approximately 500 offices in over 70 foreign countries. The following offices are located in buildings in the United States owned by us:

Property Casualty Insurance Companies:

     Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Life Insurance Companies:

     Amarillo and Houston, Texas

 

Other Operations:

     175 Water Street in New York, New York

     Livingston, New Jersey

     Stowe, Vermont

     Ft. Worth, Texas

 

In addition, our Property Casualty Insurance Companies own offices in approximately 20 foreign countries and jurisdictions including Argentina, Bermuda, Colombia, Ecuador, Japan, Mexico, the UK and Venezuela.  The remainder of the office space we use is leased.  We believe that our leases and properties are sufficient for our current purposes.

LOCATIONS OF CERTAIN ASSETS

As of December 31, 2016, approximately 11 percent of our consolidated assets were located outside the U.S. and Canada, including $532 million of cash and securities on deposit with regulatory authorities in those locations. See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional geographic information. See Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for total carrying values of cash and securities deposited by our insurance subsidiaries under requirements of regulatory authorities. 

Operations outside the U.S. and Canada and assets held abroad may be adversely affected by political developments in foreign countries, including tax changes, nationalization and changes in regulatory policy, as well as by consequence of hostilities and unrest. The risks of such occurrences and their overall effect upon us vary from country to country and cannot be predicted. If expropriation or nationalization does occur, our policy is to take all appropriate measures to seek recovery of any affected assets. Certain of the countries in which our business is conducted have currency restrictions that generally cause a delay in a company’s ability to repatriate assets and profits. See Item 1A. Risk Factors — Business and Operations for additional information.

 

ITEM 3 | Legal Proceedings

For a discussion of legal proceedings, see Note 16 — Contingencies, Commitments and Guarantees to the Consolidated Financial Statements, which is incorporated herein by reference.

 

ITEM 4 | Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          29

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 5 |  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Part II

ITEM 5 | Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

AIG’s common stock, par value $2.50 per share (AIG Common Stock), is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: AIG), as well as on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. There were approximately 27,306 stockholders of record of AIG Common Stock as of February 13, 2017.

The following table presents high and low closing sale prices of AIG Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape for each quarter of 2016 and 2015, and the dividends declared per share during those periods:

  

2016

 

2015

  

 

High

 

Low

 

Dividends

 

High

 

 

Low

 

Dividends

First quarter

$

60.64

$

50.20

$

0.320

$

56.42

  

$

48.87

$

0.125

Second quarter

 

58.32

 

48.79

 

0.320

 

63.32

 

 

54.81

 

0.125

Third quarter

 

59.86

 

51.21

 

0.320

 

64.54

 

 

55.66

 

0.280

Fourth quarter

 

66.70

 

57.38

 

0.320

 

64.12

 

 

56.92

 

0.280

Dividends

On February 14, 2017, our Board of Directors declared a cash dividend on AIG Common Stock of $0.32 per share, payable on March 29, 2017 to shareholders of record on March 15, 2017.

Any dividend payment must be approved by AIG’s Board of Directors. In determining whether to pay any dividend, our Board of Directors may consider AIG’s financial position, the performance of our businesses, our consolidated financial condition, results of operations, capital and liquidity positions and risk profile, our expectations for capital generation and utilization, the existence of investment opportunities, and other factors. AIG may become subject to restrictions on the payment of dividends and purchases of AIG Common Stock as a nonbank SIFI and a G-SII.

For a discussion of certain restrictions on the payment of dividends to AIG by some of its insurance subsidiaries, see Item 1A. Risk Factors — Liquidity, Capital and Credit — AIG Parent’s ability to access funds from our subsidiaries is limited, and Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Equity Compensation Plans

Our table of equity compensation plans will be included in a Form 10-K/A that will be filed with the SEC no later than 120 days after the end of AIG’s fiscal year.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                             30 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 5 |  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Purchases of Equity Securities

The following table provides information about purchases made by or on behalf of AIG or any “affiliated purchaser” (as defined in Rule 10b-18(a)(3) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the Exchange Act)) of AIG Common Stock during the three months ended December 31, 2016:

 

Total Number

 

Average

Total Number of Shares

Approximate Dollar Value of Shares

 

 

of Shares

 

Price Paid

Purchased as Part of Publicly

that May Yet Be Purchased Under the

 

Period

Repurchased

 

per Share

Announced Plans or Programs

Plans or Programs (in millions)

 

October 1 – 31

14,461,712

$

59.89

14,461,712

 

$

1,674

 

November 1 – 30

19,996,425

 

61.65

19,996,425

 

 

3,396

 

December 1 – 31

13,109,645

 

65.24

13,109,645

 

 

2,496

 

Total

47,567,782

$

62.10

47,567,782

 

$

2,496

 

Our Board of Directors has authorized the repurchase of shares of AIG Common Stock through a series of actions. On November 2, 2016, our Board of Directors authorized an additional increase to its previous repurchase authorization of AIG Common Stock of $3.0 billion.

During the three-month period ended December 31, 2016, we repurchased approximately 48 million shares of AIG Common Stock under this authorization for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $3.0 billion.  Under Exchange Act Rule 10b5-1 plans, from January 1 to February 14, 2017, we repurchased approximately 18 million shares of AIG Common Stock for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $1.2 billion. 

On February 14, 2017, our Board of Directors authorized an additional increase to the repurchase authorization of AIG Common Stock of $3.5 billion, resulting in a remaining authorization on such date of approximately $4.7 billion. Shares may be repurchased from time to time in the open market, private purchases, through forward, derivative, accelerated repurchase or automatic repurchase transactions or otherwise (including through the purchase of warrants).  Certain of our share repurchases have been and may from time to time be effected through Exchange Act Rule 10b5-1 repurchase plans. The timing of any future share repurchases will depend on market conditions, our financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and other factors.

See Note 17 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our share purchases.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          31

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 5 |  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Common Stock Performance Graph

The following Performance Graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return on AIG Common Stock for a five-year period (December 31, 2011 to December 31, 2016) with the cumulative total return of the S&P’s 500 stock index (which includes AIG), the S&P Property and Casualty Insurance Index (S&P P&C Index) and the S&P Life and Health Insurance Index (S&P L&H Index).  

The Performance Graph also compares the cumulative total shareholder return on AIG Common Stock to the return of a group of companies (the Former Peer Group) consisting of 14 insurance companies to which we compared our business and operations in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015:

     AEGON, N.V.

     Lincoln National Corporation

     Aflac Incorporated

     MetLife, Inc.

     Allianz Group

     Principal Financial Group, Inc.

     AXA Group

     Prudential Financial, Inc.

     Chubb Limited

     The Travelers Companies, Inc.

     CNA Financial Corporation

     XL Capital Ltd.

     The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc.

     Zurich Insurance Group

 

We believe using the S&P P&C Index and the S&P L&H Index is more comparable to our overall business and operations.

Value of $100 Invested on December 31, 2011

(All $ as of December 31st)

 

Dividend reinvestment has been assumed and returns have been weighted to reflect relative stock market capitalization.

 

  

As of December 31,

  

 

2011

 

 

2012

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

2016

AIG

$

100.00

 

$

152.16

 

$

220.93

 

$

244.66

 

$

274.44

 

$

295.72

S&P 500

 

100.00

 

 

116.00

 

 

153.57

 

 

174.60

 

 

177.01

 

 

198.18

S&P 500 Property & Casualty Insurance Index

 

100.00

 

 

120.11

 

 

166.10

 

 

192.25

 

 

210.57

 

 

243.65

S&P 500 Life & Health Insurance

 

100.00

 

 

114.59

 

 

187.33

 

 

190.98

 

 

178.93

 

 

223.41

Former Peer Group

 

100.00

 

 

128.41

 

 

190.86

 

 

193.12

 

 

202.37

 

 

222.68

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                             32 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 6 |  Selected Financial Data

 

ITEM 6 | Selected Financial Data  

The Selected Consolidated Financial Data should be read in conjunction with Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes included elsewhere herein.

 

Years Ended December 31,

(in millions, except per share data)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Premiums

$

34,393

 

$

36,655

 

$

37,254

 

$

37,499

 

$

38,189

 

   Policy fees

 

2,732

 

 

2,755

 

 

2,615

 

 

2,340

 

 

2,192

 

   Net investment income

 

14,065

 

 

14,053

 

 

16,079

 

 

15,810

 

 

20,343

 

   Net realized capital gains (losses)

 

(1,944)

 

 

776

 

 

739

 

 

1,939

 

 

1,087

 

   Aircraft leasing revenue

 

-

 

 

-

 

 

1,602

 

 

4,420

 

 

4,504

 

   Other income

 

3,121

 

 

4,088

 

 

6,117

 

 

6,866

 

 

4,899

 

Total revenues

 

52,367

 

 

58,327

 

 

64,406

 

 

68,874

 

 

71,214

 

Benefits, losses and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Policyholder benefits and losses incurred

 

32,437

 

 

31,345

 

 

28,281

 

 

29,503

 

 

32,036

 

   Interest credited to policyholder account balances

 

3,705

 

 

3,731

 

 

3,768

 

 

3,892

 

 

4,340

 

   Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs

 

4,521

 

 

5,236

 

 

5,330

 

 

5,157

 

 

5,709

 

   General operating and other expenses

 

10,989

 

 

12,686

 

 

13,138

 

 

13,564

 

 

13,013

 

   Interest expense

 

1,260

 

 

1,281

 

 

1,718

 

 

2,142

 

 

2,319

 

   Aircraft leasing expenses

 

-

 

 

-

 

 

1,585

 

 

4,549

 

 

4,138

 

   Net loss on extinguishment of debt

 

74

 

 

756

 

 

2,282

 

 

651

 

 

32

 

   Net (gain) loss on sale of properties and divested businesses

 

(545)

 

 

11

 

 

(2,197)

 

 

48

 

 

6,736

 

Total benefits, losses and expenses

 

52,441

 

 

55,046

 

 

53,905

 

 

59,506

 

 

68,323

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes

 

(74)

 

 

3,281

 

 

10,501

 

 

9,368

 

 

2,891

 

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

185

 

 

1,059

 

 

2,927

 

 

360

 

 

(808)

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations

 

(259)

 

 

2,222

 

 

7,574

 

 

9,008

 

 

3,699

 

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes

 

(90)

 

 

-

 

 

(50)

 

 

84

 

 

1

 

Net income (loss)

 

(349)

 

 

2,222

 

 

7,524

 

 

9,092

 

 

3,700

 

Net income (loss) from continuing operations attributable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to noncontrolling interests

 

500

 

 

26

 

 

(5)

 

 

7

 

 

262

 

Net income (loss) attributable to AIG

 

(849)

 

 

2,196

 

 

7,529

 

 

9,085

 

 

3,438

 

Income (loss) per common share attributable to AIG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   common shareholders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Income (loss) from continuing operations

 

(0.70)

 

 

1.69

 

 

5.31

 

 

6.11

 

 

2.04

 

   Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

(0.08)

 

 

-

 

 

(0.04)

 

 

0.05

 

 

-

 

   Net income (loss) attributable to AIG

 

(0.78)

 

 

1.69

 

 

5.27

 

 

6.16

 

 

2.04

 

Diluted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Income (loss) from continuing operations

 

(0.70)

 

 

1.65

 

 

5.24

 

 

6.08

 

 

2.04

 

   Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

(0.08)

 

 

-

 

 

(0.04)

 

 

0.05

 

 

-

 

   Net income (loss) attributable to AIG

 

(0.78)

 

 

1.65

 

 

5.20

 

 

6.13

 

 

2.04

 

Dividends declared per common share

 

1.28

 

 

0.81

 

 

0.50

 

 

0.20

 

 

-

 

 

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          33

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 6 |  Selected Financial Data

 

Year-end balance sheet data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Total investments

 

328,175

 

 

338,354

 

 

355,766

 

 

356,428

 

 

375,824

 

   Total assets

 

498,264

 

 

496,842

 

 

515,500

 

 

541,221

 

 

548,451

 

   Long-term debt(a)

 

30,912

 

 

29,249

 

 

31,136

 

 

41,585

 

 

48,318

 

   Total liabilities(a)

 

421,406

 

 

406,632

 

 

408,228

 

 

440,110

 

 

449,448

 

   Total AIG shareholders' equity

 

76,300

 

 

89,658

 

 

106,898

 

 

100,470

 

 

98,002

 

   Total equity

 

76,858

 

 

90,210

 

 

107,272

 

 

101,081

 

 

98,669

 

   Book value per common share

 

76.66

 

 

75.10

 

 

77.69

 

 

68.62

 

 

66.38

 

   Book value per common share, excluding Accumulated other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      comprehensive income (loss)(b)

 

73.41

 

 

72.97

 

 

69.98

 

 

64.28

 

 

57.87

 

   Adjusted book value per common share(b)

 

58.57

 

 

58.94

 

 

58.23

 

 

52.12

 

 

45.30

 

   Adjusted book value per common share, including

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      dividend growth(b)

$

59.79

 

$

59.26

 

$

58.23

 

$

52.12

 

$

45.30

 

   ROE

 

(1.0)

%

 

2.2

%

 

7.1

%

 

9.2

%

 

3.4

%

   Adjusted ROE(b)

 

0.6

 

 

3.7

 

 

8.8

 

 

9.0

 

 

8.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

(in millions, except per share data)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Other data (pre-tax, from continuing operations):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Catastrophe-related losses(c)

$

1,330

 

$

731

 

$

728

 

$

787

 

$

2,652

 

   Prior year unfavorable development

 

5,788

 

 

4,119

 

 

703

 

 

557

 

 

421

 

   Other-than-temporary impairments

 

559

 

 

671

 

 

247

 

 

232

 

 

1,050

 

   Adjustment to federal deferred tax valuation allowance

$

83

 

$

110

 

$

(181)

 

$

(3,165)

 

$

(1,907)

 

(a) Long-term debt and total liabilities include debt issuance costs of $88 million, $101 million, $81 million, $108 million, and $182 million at December 31, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2012, respectively. See Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

(b)  Book value per common share excluding Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (AOCI), Book value per common share excluding AOCI and DTA (Adjusted book value per common share), Adjusted book value per common share, including dividend growth, and return on equity – after-tax operating income excluding AOCI and DTA (Adjusted return on equity) are non-GAAP financial measures and the reconciliations to the relevant GAAP financial measures are below.  See Item 7. MD&A — Use of Non‑GAAP Measures for additional information.

(c) Natural catastrophe losses are generally weather or seismic events having a net impact on AIG in excess of $10 million each. Catastrophes also include certain man-made events, such as terrorism and civil disorders that meet the $10 million threshold.

Items Affecting Comparability Between Periods

The following are significant developments that affected multiple periods and financial statement captions.

Asset Dispositions in 2014, 2015 and 2016

We completed the sale of International Lease Finance Corporation (ILFC) on May 14, 2014, and in 2015 we sold all of our ordinary shares of AerCap Holdings N.V. (AerCap) received as part of the consideration for the sale of ILFC, as further discussed in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. We also executed multiple asset dispositions in 2016. See Item 7. MD&A — Executive Summary for further discussion.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            34 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 6 |  Selected Financial Data

 

Reconciliation of Non-GAAP measures included in Selected Financial Data

The following table presents a reconciliation of Book value per common share to Book value per common share, excluding AOCI, Book value per common share, excluding AOCI and DTA (Adjusted book value per common share), and Adjusted book value per common share, including dividend growth, which are non-GAAP measures. See Item 7. MD&A — Use of Non‑GAAP Measures for additional information.

 

At December 31,

(in millions, except per share data)

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

Total AIG shareholders' equity

$

76,300

$

89,658

$

106,898

$

100,470

$

98,002

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

3,230

 

2,537

 

10,617

 

6,360

 

12,574

Total AIG shareholders' equity, excluding AOCI

 

73,070

 

87,121

 

96,281

 

94,110

 

85,428

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred tax assets

 

14,770

 

16,751

 

16,158

 

17,797

 

18,549

Adjusted shareholders' equity

 

58,300

 

70,370

 

80,123

 

76,313

 

66,879

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add: Cumulative quarterly common stock dividends

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

above $0.125 per share*

 

1,216

 

378

 

-

 

-

 

-

Adjusted shareholders' equity, including

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dividend growth

$

59,516

$

70,748

$

80,123

$

76,313

$

66,879

Total common shares outstanding

 

995,335,841

 

1,193,916,617

 

1,375,926,971

 

1,464,063,323

 

1,476,321,935

Book value per common share

$

76.66

$

75.10

$

77.69

$

68.62

$

66.38

Book value per common share, excluding AOCI

 

73.41

 

72.97

 

69.98

 

64.28

 

57.87

Adjusted book value per common share

 

58.57

 

58.94

 

58.23

 

52.12

 

45.30

Adjusted book value per common share,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

including dividend growth

$

59.79

$

59.26

$

58.23

$

52.12

$

45.30

*   Prior to the third quarter of 2015, dividends per share were $0.125.

The following table presents a reconciliation of Return on equity to Adjusted Return on equity, which is a non-GAAP measure.  See Item 7. MD&A — Use of Non‑GAAP Measures for additional information.

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(dollars in millions)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Net income (loss) attributable to AIG

$

(849)

 

$

2,196

 

$

7,529

 

$

9,085

 

$

3,438

 

After-tax operating income attributable to AIG

 

406

 

 

2,872

 

 

6,941

 

 

6,449

 

 

6,501

 

Average AIG Shareholders' equity

 

86,617

 

 

101,558

 

 

105,589

 

 

98,850

 

 

101,873

 

Average AOCI

 

5,722

 

 

7,598

 

 

9,781

 

 

8,865

 

 

9,718

 

Average AIG Shareholders' equity, excluding average AOCI

 

80,895

 

 

93,960

 

 

95,808

 

 

89,985

 

 

92,155

 

Average DTA

 

15,905

 

 

15,803

 

 

16,611

 

 

18,150

 

 

19,250

 

Average adjusted Shareholders' equity

$

64,990

 

$

78,157

 

$

79,197

 

$

71,835

 

$

72,905

 

ROE

 

(1.0)

%

 

2.2

%

 

7.1

%

 

9.2

%

 

3.4

%

Adjusted Return on Equity

 

0.6

 

 

3.7

 

 

8.8

 

 

9.0

 

 

8.9

 

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                          35

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 7 | Management’s  Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (Annual Report) and other publicly available documents may include, and officers and representatives of American International Group, Inc. (AIG) may from time to time make, projections, goals, assumptions and statements that may constitute “forward‑looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These projections, goals, assumptions and statements are not historical facts but instead represent only our belief regarding future events, many of which, by their nature, are inherently uncertain and outside our control. These projections, goals, assumptions and statements include statements preceded by, followed by or including words such as "will," “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “focused on achieving,” “view,” “target,” "goal" or “estimate.” These projections, goals, assumptions and statements may address, among other things, our:

     exposures to subprime mortgages, monoline insurers, the residential and commercial real estate markets, state and municipal bond issuers, sovereign bond issuers, the energy sector and currency exchange rates;

     exposure to European governments and European financial institutions;

     strategy for risk management;

     actual and anticipated sales of businesses or asset divestitures or monetizations;

     restructuring of business operations, including anticipated restructuring charges and annual cost savings;

     generation of deployable capital;

     strategies to increase return on equity and earnings per share;

     strategies to grow net investment income, efficiently manage capital, grow book value per common share, and reduce expenses;

     anticipated organizational and business changes;

     strategies for customer retention, growth, product development, market position, financial results and reserves; and

     segments’ revenues and combined ratios.

 

It is possible that our actual results and financial condition will differ, possibly materially, from the results and financial condition indicated in these projections, goals, assumptions and statements. Factors that could cause our actual results to differ, possibly materially, from those in the specific projections, goals, assumptions and statements include:

     changes in market conditions;

     negative impacts on customers, business partners and other stakeholders;

     the occurrence of catastrophic events, both natural and man-made;

     significant legal proceedings;

     the timing and applicable requirements of any new regulatory framework to which we are subject as a nonbank systemically important financial institution (SIFI) and as a global systemically important insurer (G‑SII);

     concentrations in our investment portfolios;

     actions by credit rating agencies;

     judgments concerning casualty insurance underwriting and insurance liabilities;

     our ability to successfully manage Legacy portfolios;

     our ability to successfully reduce costs and expenses and make business and organizational changes without negatively impacting client relationships or our competitive position;

     our ability to successfully dispose of, or monetize, businesses or assets;

     judgments concerning the recognition of deferred tax assets;

     judgments concerning estimated restructuring charges and estimated cost savings; and

     such other factors discussed in:

   Part I, Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report; and

   this Part II, Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) of this Annual Report.

We are not under any obligation (and expressly disclaim any obligation) to update or alter any projections, goals, assumptions or other statements, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

AIG | 2016 Form 10-K                            36 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

ITEM 7 | Index to Item 7

 

 

INDEX TO ITEM 7

 

 
 

 

Page

Use of Non-GAAP Measures

 

38

Critical Accounting Estimates

 

40

Executive Summary

 

55

Overview

 

55

Financial Performance Summary

 

56

AIG's Outlook – Industry and Economic Factors

 

59

Consolidated Results of Operations

 

63

Business Segment Operations

 

67

Commercial Insurance

 

68

Consumer Insurance

 

80

Other Operations  

 

99

Legacy Portfolio